Environmental Racism is Garbage! Symposium – Call for Submissions, deadline 30 Nov, 2020

Submission Deadline:  30 November 2020  
Symposium: 27-29 May 2021  

The aim of this interactive virtual research-creation and art symposium is to bear modest witness to waste as a symptom of environmental racism. At least one billion people live in over a quarter of a million slums worldwide, often with no formal waste or sanitation infrastructure or services (Davis 2007). And in economically affluent countries, landfills and other waste management systems are most often sited in or close to poor and racialized communities (for example, Amegah and Jaakkola 2016; Furedy 1993; Mothiba, Moja, and Loans 2017; Parizeau 2006) who bear a disproportionate burden of persistent exposure to the risks, hazards and contamination of pollution (Hird in press; Hird and Zahara 2016). 

Environmental Racism is Garbage seeks knowledge production and acts of resistance at the intersection of art, politics, and the relationship between racialized injustice and ecological crisis. We invite contributions and collaborations from visual and performance-based artists, curators, theorists and activists, to create submissions that engage with the interconnections between environmental health, socio-economic conditions, racialized discrimination, social justice. We are interested in new or recent work in any medium that could be displayed in a browser. Transdisciplinary work driven by creative inquiry and lived experience will be forefronted.

This virtual (web-based) symposium will be synchronous and asynchronous and feature artwork displayed in the browser as well as keynote speakers, discussion panels and other additions. The symposium will be archived on a dedicated website.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Project description and [technical] requirements for displaying (online), including artist/author statement (2 pages maximum).
  2. Supporting documentation: i.e. maximum 5 images, 1 (3 min or under) video clip or sound recording sample.
  3. Current CV (3 pages maximum) for all team members
  4. Artist/author/activist/curator/theorist biography for all team members (maximum 100 words each)

Please submit your work through this form by November 30, 2020. Submissions will be reviewed by a transdisciplinary panel including members of The Seedbox Consortium, Canada’s Waste Flow, and Queen’s University. 

Priority will be given to applicants who are Indigenous, Black, people of colour, women, LGBTQ2+, people with disabilities, and/or are members of other equity-seeking groups.

Each project selected will receive a payment of $1000 CAD and another $500 CAD per additional artist, for a total of up to $2000 CAD per submission. Project Fees will be paid after completion of the symposium. Details of the post-symposium publication to follow.
The full call for submission can be found here
Please submit projects here by November 30th, 2020  

We invite you to share this call with colleagues who might be interested, and direct any questions to: help@environmentalracismisgarbage.art

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar with Adam Wickberg (KTH) on 5th June, 10:15 – 12:00

Welcome to The Posthumanities Hub Seminar with Adam Wickberg on Coloniality, Media and the Anthropocene in Early Americas.

The seminar takes place in the seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH (Teknikringen 74 D, Stockholm).

When: 5th June, 10:15 – 12:00

FB event

Abstract:

This talk will address historiography and layers of time based on a decolonial understanding of modernity and its relation to the Anthropocene. The point of departure for my critical discussion of history is the geological evidence for an Anthropocene golden spike proposed by Lewis & Maslin (2015) known as the ”Orbis hypothesis”, as well as the discourse on futurity built into current policy on climate change. The aim is to develop a critical temporality for the Anthropocene, drawing on work by historians on the contemporary crisis of time (Assmann 2013, Hartog 2016) as well as insights from environmental and media history. I argue that the emergence of global political expansionism and extractionist politics with the Spanish Empire in the latter part of the 16th century marked the beginning of an era which is still affecting policy and politics, particularly in relation to climate change. Particularly, I argue that the systematic use of media and information technology for extractionist purposes is integral to what has been understood as modernity (Latour 2017, Haraway 2017, Moore 2015, Mignolo 2015, Sloterdijk 2015). At the same time, the established way of addressing climate change sustains coloniality and projects the cost of carbon intense living a century into the future, as most models end with 2100. The insights of what might then be termed Anthropocene historiography challenges traditional linear conceptions of time by highlighting how the present eco crisis is an effect of past political actions, just as current inability to properly address these issues will come into effect and cause damage in the future.

Bio: 

Adam Wickberg is a Postdoctoral fellow in media history at the Environmental Humanities Lab and a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute for History of Science in Berlin (MPWIG I). His current research concerns the Early Modern media history of the Anthropocene, where he traces the global changes of long distance governing of nature brought about by early Spanish colonialism. The project studies the human-nature relationship of Iberian colonial history using the critical aspects of media and anthropogenic altering of natural habitats as a material and discursive practice. The bureaucratic use of paper – documents, files, maps, surveys, orders – as a form of governance of nature over great distances is a focal point of the study and are conceptualized as environing media. Recent publications include Pellucid Paper: Poetry and Bureaucratic Media (Open Humanities Press 2018) and “Plus Ultra: Francisco Hernández and the Mapping of American Natureculture” in Necsus: European Journal of Media Studies (2018:2).

The launch of DISTANCIA: A more than human web series set in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

Welcome to the Screening of

DISTANCIA

A more than human web series set in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

 Imagined and visualized by

Camila Marambio and Carolina Saquel

With participation of Sebastián Arce, Ariel Bustamante, Javiera Carmona, Julio Gastón Contreras, César Díaz, Valentina Espinoza, Alberto Harambour, Matías Illanes,  Ivette Martinez, Michael Taussig and Cecilia Vicuña.

May 22, 2019, at 15-17h

DIS

THE SCREENING WILL BE FOLLOWED BY A DISCUSSION WITH

DISTANCIA’s CO-DIRECTOR CAMILA MARAMBIO.

 

Distancia is a story of environmental proportions, a series of tales that have demanded to be told from beyond the strait of Magellan. Speaking histories of unlawful appropriations, exterminations, and exploitations, each episode sketches the shape of a place known as Tierra Del Fuego. Documenting the drive for justice and kinship between a few unlikely characters Distancia chronicles a wind so relentless it shapes the mind. Distancia reports on remote civilian entanglement with volatile geopolitical agendas. Distancia murmurs a road under construction, and in doing so opens a poethical portal.

DISTANCIA

Venue:  CNEMA, Norrköping (room: Statisten)

Kungsgatan 54, 602 33 Norrköping

Admission: FREE.

Booking 011-15 63 00

Distancia is produced as part of the nomadic research programme ENSAYOS, curated by Camila Marambio, see https://ensayostierradelfuego.net/

The event is co-organized by Tema Genus and REMESO, Linköping University.

Contact: Professor Nina Lykke nina.lykke@liu.se), Tema Genus

and PhD student Asher Goldstein (asher.goldstein@liu.se), REMESO.