Water@theCentre, 3d December – Speed Talks on Water Relations and Sustainable Water Futures

Welcome to this open digital conference at KTH where water is at the centre.

If you are hungry for oceanic humanities tune in to Cecilia Åsberg’s speed talk in session C, where new and unconventional approaches to how to think, work with, make use of, and take care of our most precious resource are explored.

The conference will look at advances in science and technology that helps us manage water – our most precious resource – sustainably now and in the future. We also discuss the role of universities for collaborative knowledge production, in water as well as in other areas. What is needed of us to make collaboration meaningful? In three parallel speed talk sessions, we learn about new discoveries and research across all disciplines.

Program
09.00-09.20    Welcome and Introduction
09.20-10.00     Keynote lecture: Prof. Dr. Janet Hering, Director of Eawag
10.00-10.15     Break
10.15-11.00     Parallel speed talk sessions:
Session A: Transforming water infrastructure
Session B: Healthy, safe and inclusive
Session C: New horizons for water

11.00-11.15     Break
11.15-12.00     Panel discussion on the role of universities

More info and registration
Detailed program can be found here

Gender Studies Conference 12-13 Nov 2020 (online), keynotes and programme is out!

Keynote speakers:

Cecilia Åsberg – More-than-human feminisms, and sea changes
KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Linköping University, Sweden

Roman Kuhar – Anti-gender movements across Europe and beyond
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Kyla Schuller – The Future of Gender: Rethinking the Sex/Gender Distinction
Rutgers University, USA

The 2020 Gender Studies conference explores futures as matters of intense politics, imaginings and debates from feminist and intersectional perspectives. The conference theme, “reclaiming futures”, suggests that how futures are envisioned, enacted and contested, in the present and in the past, has significant implications for equality and social justice and the very possibilities of a livable and just world. The conference asks what kinds of feminist and intersectional engagements with possible futures have emerged, are emerging, or may be imagined. We hope to investigate collectively the implications of the ongoing social, political and environmental changes for the future of gender studies and feminist politics.

Read more here: https://events.tuni.fi/genderstudiesconference2020/speakers/

Environmental Racism is Garbage! Symposium – Call for Submissions, deadline 30 Nov, 2020

Submission Deadline:  30 November 2020  
Symposium: 27-29 May 2021  

The aim of this interactive virtual research-creation and art symposium is to bear modest witness to waste as a symptom of environmental racism. At least one billion people live in over a quarter of a million slums worldwide, often with no formal waste or sanitation infrastructure or services (Davis 2007). And in economically affluent countries, landfills and other waste management systems are most often sited in or close to poor and racialized communities (for example, Amegah and Jaakkola 2016; Furedy 1993; Mothiba, Moja, and Loans 2017; Parizeau 2006) who bear a disproportionate burden of persistent exposure to the risks, hazards and contamination of pollution (Hird in press; Hird and Zahara 2016). 

Environmental Racism is Garbage seeks knowledge production and acts of resistance at the intersection of art, politics, and the relationship between racialized injustice and ecological crisis. We invite contributions and collaborations from visual and performance-based artists, curators, theorists and activists, to create submissions that engage with the interconnections between environmental health, socio-economic conditions, racialized discrimination, social justice. We are interested in new or recent work in any medium that could be displayed in a browser. Transdisciplinary work driven by creative inquiry and lived experience will be forefronted.

This virtual (web-based) symposium will be synchronous and asynchronous and feature artwork displayed in the browser as well as keynote speakers, discussion panels and other additions. The symposium will be archived on a dedicated website.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Project description and [technical] requirements for displaying (online), including artist/author statement (2 pages maximum).
  2. Supporting documentation: i.e. maximum 5 images, 1 (3 min or under) video clip or sound recording sample.
  3. Current CV (3 pages maximum) for all team members
  4. Artist/author/activist/curator/theorist biography for all team members (maximum 100 words each)

Please submit your work through this form by November 30, 2020. Submissions will be reviewed by a transdisciplinary panel including members of The Seedbox Consortium, Canada’s Waste Flow, and Queen’s University. 

Priority will be given to applicants who are Indigenous, Black, people of colour, women, LGBTQ2+, people with disabilities, and/or are members of other equity-seeking groups.

Each project selected will receive a payment of $1000 CAD and another $500 CAD per additional artist, for a total of up to $2000 CAD per submission. Project Fees will be paid after completion of the symposium. Details of the post-symposium publication to follow.
The full call for submission can be found here
Please submit projects here by November 30th, 2020  

We invite you to share this call with colleagues who might be interested, and direct any questions to: help@environmentalracismisgarbage.art

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Ingesting the Hydrocene” with Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris

When: 9 December, 13:15-15:00 (Swedish time)

Where: Online. In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub@gmail.com by 7th Dec 2020 at the latest.

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris, Penelope and Lucinda, film still, 2016

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris. Photo: Emmeli Person

Meet Australian/Swedish curator, writer and lecturer Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris! Bronwyn is based in Stockholm, a current PhD student at UNSW Art & Design researching water and art in her thesis entitled ‘Ingesting the Hydrocene: Watery thinking for artistic response-ability in the climate crisis’. She is employed at Stockholm University, based at Accelerator and leading the Art+Research program, as well as a Lecturer in Department of Culture and Aesthetics for the Masters of Art Curating. Bronwyn was previously Curator at Index – The Swedish Contemporary Arts Foundation. Research interests are focused upon processes of ecology in contemporary art, water as social metaphor and feminist methodologies. Working with practical learning platforms, artistic research, publications, and exhibitions, she works internationally as a curator and lecturer.
https://bronwynbc.com/
https://su-se.academia.edu/BronwynBaileyCharteris

Ingesting the Hydrocene

The Hydrocene is a curatorial theory and practice Bronwyn has created to amplify the pioneering ways some artists and curators are collaborating with water. The Hydrocene argues for artistic methods of thinking with water in the age of accelerating climate crises. The Hydrocene is embodied and relational. It amplifies unexamined perspectives on the interrelation of art, climate, water and intersectional feminisms. By arguing for water-centered artistic practices, the Hydrocene offers up a model for engaging with embodiment, hydrofeminism, transcorporeality and response-ability in the interconnected zone of natureculture. The presentation will offer a short introduction to the Hydrocene and then expand upon artist Latai Taumoepeau – specifically her work with ice, water torture and the climate crisis.

“A Sea Change in the Humanities”: joint KTH and The Posthumanities Hub Seminar with Prof. Cecilia Åsberg

Welcome to the joint event hosted by KTH Higher Seminars and The Posthumanities Hub Seminar series:

the seminar with Prof. Cecilia Åsberg (KTH/Linköping University) on:

A Sea Change in the Humanities

The seminar takes place on 28th September 2020 at 13:15 – 15:00.

For more how to access the online event, see: https://www.kth.se/en/abe/inst/philhist/historia/2.78498/hogreseminarium

Photo: Marietta Radomska

Abstract:

All through the extended history of Earth, the coast line has been a zone of unrest where waves and tides have forged life and land on this planet. Despite sudden changes to our oceanic environments, the wrack zone by the edge of the sea with its kelp forests, mussel beds, flotsam and jetsam, remains a strange and beautiful place (as noted by Rachel Carson). This is one of the starting points for the research in the oceanic (environmental) humanities project, Sea Change. Another starting point is the possibilities for cooking, curing and curating with kelp explored at Lofoten International Arts Festival in 2019, the artistic duo Cooking Sections (and their exhibition 2021 at Bonniers Kunsthall), and that we are now entering the declared UN Decade of the Oceans (2021-2030). Sea Change  is a knowledge- and capacity-building project for feminist posthumanities, aiming to connect science with art, humanities and local people so to catalyze societal transformation on low trophic ways of eating, socializing and thinking, together. 

Bio:

Cecilia Åsberg, PhD, Guest Professor of STS, Gender and Environment at KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm; Professor of Gender, Nature, Culture at Linköping University, and since 2008 founding director of the Posthumanities Hub. In 2005 she was the first to defend a PhD in Gender Studies in Sweden (a feminist science study on the popular imaginary of the new genetics), and in 2013 she inaugurated environmental humanities in The Seed Box (Mistra-Formas) research programme as Founding Director. Åsberg has attracted over €6 million in grants for her team; supervised 14 PhD students; published extensively (in Swedish, Dutch, English); given talks and taught gender studies, EH, STS, and posthumanities to BA-MA and PhD students in various positions at a range of international universities, incl Lancaster U, Utrecht Utrecht, NL, and as Fellow of Rachel Carson Centre, LMU, Germany. 

Recent publications (in 2020) include: 

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “A Critical Cartography of New Materialist Constellations & Interventions in Times of Terror(ism)” with Dr. Evelien Geerts

When: 5 November, 13:15-15:00 (Swedish time)

Where: Online. In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub@gmail.com by 3rd November 2020 at the latest.

As part of The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series, we are exited to present Dr. Evelien Geerts (PhD UC Santa Cruz), a multidisciplinary philosopher and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Birmingham (UK), working on the ERC-funded ‘Urban Terrorism in Europe (2004-19): Remembering, Imagining, and Anticipating Violence’ project. Her research interests include new materialisms, critical epistemologies, political philosophical questions of identity, difference, and violence, and critical & diffractive pedagogies. She has published in Philosophy Today, Women’s Studies International Forum and Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge, is furthermore an avid philosophy meme-creator, and part of the Dutch Journal of Gender Studies’ editorial board.

Dr. Evelien Geerts

A Critical Cartography of New Materialist Constellations & Interventions in Times of Terror(ism)

Abstract:
This paper anticipates on my monograph project on critical new materialist theories and the idea of “theorizing from the ground up” during times of global crisis (such as the COVID-19 crisis we are currently experiencing; see Geerts 2020) and terror(ism) in particular.

Using (and commenting on) the new materialist methodologies of critical cartography and diffraction, this paper first of all wishes to reflect upon what it means to “theorize from the ground up” in a feminist philosophical manner by offering a situated critical cartography of contemporary new materialist thought. It is then argued that such a critical cartography is not only a novel but also much needed undertaking, as we, more than almost two decades after the Habermas-Derrida dialogues on terror(ism) (Borradori 2003), are in need of a Zeitgeist-adjusted conceptual framework that takes the more-than-human seriously. Such a “grounded”, critical new materialist framework could assist us with painting a more holistic picture of the complex ontological, epistemological, and eco-ethico-political entangled aspects of global crises, and, specifically, terrorist events, such as the Paris 2015 and Brussels 2016 attacks; the actual terror they produce; and the bio-/necropolitical repercussions they often engender.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: EASCLE Webinar on ‘Toxic Embodiment’ by Prof. Cecilia Åsberg and Dr. Marietta Radomska

Photo: Cecilia Åsberg

Join us for the EASCLE Webinar on ‘Toxic Embodiment’ – for more info click HERE.

Webinar: ‘Toxic Embodiment’

By Prof. Cecilia Åsberg and Dr. Marietta Radomska

Sat, Aug 25th, 10:30-12:00 CEST.

REGISTER HERE

Existential concerns around environmental health today involve a much wider set of issues (and a wider set of bodies) as we intra-act with antibiotics, nanoparticles, and untested chemical cocktails through the food we eat, the make-up we wear, the new sofas we sit on, or the environments we dwell in. We are more acutely aware today of how we are in nature, and nature – polluted as it may be – in us. With the recognition of the ecological crisis and its gravity, we have – according to some scientific experts – entered a new geological period: the Anthropocene, in which it is the human who constitutes the biggest threat to the survival of the earth and its human as well as more-than-human inhabitants.

Through the proliferation of plastics and chemical pollution more generally, petrochemicals constitute in effect forms of social, material, and biological writing of toxic embodiment. This makes toxic embodiment an urgent concern for environmental humanities and for environmental literacies at large.

Advancements in genetic engineering, the chemicalization of food production, and the rapid growth of the pharmaceutical industry have made human, animal, and plant embodiments simultaneously enhanced and debilitated. They become ‘toxic bodies’, ‘pharmaceutical subjects’, and they leave a toxic footprint in the world.

By approaching the theme of ‘toxic embodiment’ from a broad and transdisciplinary perspective (eco-cultural studies; body and gender studies; medicine and life sciences; posthumanities; science, technology, and society; and, especially, the environmental humanities), this webinar will explore the risks and the opportunities that these changes may bring.

More specifically, the session will engage with the topic of toxic embodiment as our always-already environed technobodies, and how they/we are shaped by health norms and toxic realities that put into question the notions of health and disease, vulnerability and well-being, as well as life/death, and the dis/ability of the ‘natural’ human body. Here, the ‘human’ emerges as a set of toxic embodiments – ones that are radically tethered to, or shaped by, their milieus, including their more-than-human companions (synthetic molecules, microbes, fungi, plants, and animals), and the ways they/we all come together.

 

Inspirational questions:

  1.  How do questions of toxicity and its impact on both human and nonhuman bodies influence environmental discourses? How do they influence the articulation of environmental problems? What kind of imaginaries do they mobilise and what futures do they seek to envision?
  2. What conceptualisations of the body emerge from the present narratives on toxicity? What are the understandings of the subject that are (re)produced through these narratives?
  3. Environmental discourses that engage with the issues of toxicity often put emphasis on the ideas of the natural and the anthropogenic, the normal and the abnormal, as well as health and illness. How are these notions understood in the context of the webinar readings? Are they reworked or abandoned? What does the enquiry of toxic embodiment do to their conventional understandings?
  4. What new approaches, methodologies, and methods does the work on toxic embodiment offer?

Primary literature:

Ah-King, Malin and Eva Hayward. 2013. ‘Toxic Sexes: Perverting Pollution and Queering Hormone Disruption’. O-zone: A journal of object-oriented studies 1: 1-12. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/6368781/Toxic_sexes_Perverting_pollution_and_queering_hormone_disruption

Alaimo, Stacy. 2016. ‘Conclusion’ in Exposed. Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press. Available at: https://dearchivecollaboration.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/alaimo-from-exposed.pdf

Chen, Mel Y. 2011. ‘Toxic Animacies. Inanimate Affections’. GLQ 17(2-3): 265-286. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1215/10642684-1163400

Davis, Heather. 2015. ‘Toxic Progeny: The Plastisphere and Other Queer Futures.’ philoSOPHIA 5 (2): 231-250. Available at: http://heathermdavis.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Philosophia_Davis.pdf

Additional readings:

Zahara, Alexander R.D. and Myra Hird. 2015. ‘Raven, Dog, Human: Inhuman Colonialism and Unsettling Cosmologies’. Environmental Humanities 7: 169-190. Available at: http://environmentalhumanities.org/arch/vol7/7.9.pdf

Giovanna DiChiro (2010) ‘Polluted Politics? Confronting Toxic Discourse, Sex Panic, and Eco-Normativity’ in Queer Ecologies, eds. C. Sandilands & B. Erickson. Bloomington: Indiana University Press: 199-230.

Haraway, Donna. 2016. ‘Awash in Urine: DES and Premarin in Multispecies Response-ability’ in Staying with the Trouble. Durham: Duke University Press: 104-116.