Call for Contributions: Ecomusicology, Sounding Board

Ethnomusicology Review would like to invite you to share perspectives from your research for our online platform “Sounding Board.”

Sounding Board is an informal, yet academically focused online platform to discuss research, ideas, and other issues related to the fields of musicology and ethnomusicology.

Deeply interdisciplinary, the field of ecomusicology is a branch of study exploring the various and complex nexus between people, nature and sounds. Ecomusicologists can come from the fields of composition, acoustic ecology, bio-acoustics, ethnomusicology, historical musicology, biology as well as ecocriticism, biosemiotics, ecosemiotics, phenomenology.

Texts on any of the following subjects are welcome:

-Music and Climate Change

-Music in the Age of Anthropocene

-Posthumanities and sounds /music / acoustic patterns

-DNA / Metabolic / Transgenetic poetics and sounds

-Music in or about Landscapes

-Natural Sounds, acoustic ecology, bio-acoustics

-Music and/in Environment

-Music and/ in Place or Space

-Music and ecosemiotics / biosemiotics

-Music and Robotic Poetics

-Music and phenomenology / eco phenomenology

-The death of music or an era after music

Additionally, if you have any other project, conference paper, or unpublished work dealing with issues surrounding ecomusicology, feel free to reach out!

Please contact Nikoleta Zampaki, at nikoletazampaki@hotmail.com if you wish to contribute or have any questions.

Feminist posthumanities is for everybody!

Human nature is not the oxymoron we imagined it to be. In this new planetary age of the Anthropocene, defined by human-induced climatic, biological, and even geological transformations, we humans are fully in nature. And nature is fully in us. This was, of course, always the case, but it is more conspicuously so now than ever before: people are entangled in co-constitutive relationships with nature and the environment, with other animals and organisms, with medicine and technology, with science and epistemic politics. We live and die, play, thrive, and suffer by each other. For example, think of “mad cow” disease, where humans feeding cows with by-products from slaughtered sheep infected with the prionic disorder “scrapie” in turn generates prion disorders in cows that get transmitted to human beef consumers through a series of transcorporeal (Alaimo 2010) gestures across species. We can think, too, of pollen allergies and their increased prevalence as an index of our environed embodiment. Or how hormone-like substances seep from plastics into microorganisms, fish bodies, human infants in increasingly aggressive polymere ecologies. While culture and nature never were in fact separated but for academic divisions of labour, we live in a time when the so called “human mastery”, alterations, and especially the “slow violence (Nixon 2011) of these naturcultural relationships of embodied environments and environed embodiments appear to us more clearly. For such power-imbued yet generative relationships, we need a more-than-human humanities. We also need expertise on human differences; those between men and women; between men and men, or women and women; transgender, and internal to our, after all, not-so-fully rational human (and microbial) Selfhood. More-than-human and human differences (gender, class, race, nationality, age, sexual orientation, specie- or land relationality, etc) interplay in intricate ways, socially. Our work at the Posthumanities Hub, take such differences very seriously as we make our case for diverse feminist forms of the posthumanities (Wolfe 2003). Our starting points are diverse too; a love for science, art and philosophy,  postnatural feminisms, technological empowerment, humanities disciplines like history, literature, philosophy, languages, the cyborg ontology and situated epistemology of Donna Haraway (1991), anti-racist justice movements and anti-colonial environmentalism, veganism, plant theory, and multispecies justice. All of these are critical and creative endevours that provide mind-sets and society’s psyche with new concepts to guide thought and practice.  At The Posthumanities Hub, we embrace a feminist posthumanities that stands able to frame naturecultures unfolding and recalibrate humanities analytics for an Anthropocene of many differences. We aim for alliances and research worthy of our complex times, a humanities for our  “postnatural” condition of human and nonhuman co-constitution of the planetary.