The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Ingesting the Hydrocene” with Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris

When: 9 December, 13:15-15:00 (Swedish time)

Where: Online. In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub@gmail.com by 7th Dec 2020 at the latest.

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris, Penelope and Lucinda, film still, 2016

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris. Photo: Emmeli Person

Meet Australian/Swedish curator, writer and lecturer Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris! Bronwyn is based in Stockholm, a current PhD student at UNSW Art & Design researching water and art in her thesis entitled ‘Ingesting the Hydrocene: Watery thinking for artistic response-ability in the climate crisis’. She is employed at Stockholm University, based at Accelerator and leading the Art+Research program, as well as a Lecturer in Department of Culture and Aesthetics for the Masters of Art Curating. Bronwyn was previously Curator at Index – The Swedish Contemporary Arts Foundation. Research interests are focused upon processes of ecology in contemporary art, water as social metaphor and feminist methodologies. Working with practical learning platforms, artistic research, publications, and exhibitions, she works internationally as a curator and lecturer.
https://bronwynbc.com/
https://su-se.academia.edu/BronwynBaileyCharteris

Ingesting the Hydrocene

The Hydrocene is a curatorial theory and practice Bronwyn has created to amplify the pioneering ways some artists and curators are collaborating with water. The Hydrocene argues for artistic methods of thinking with water in the age of accelerating climate crises. The Hydrocene is embodied and relational. It amplifies unexamined perspectives on the interrelation of art, climate, water and intersectional feminisms. By arguing for water-centered artistic practices, the Hydrocene offers up a model for engaging with embodiment, hydrofeminism, transcorporeality and response-ability in the interconnected zone of natureculture. The presentation will offer a short introduction to the Hydrocene and then expand upon artist Latai Taumoepeau – specifically her work with ice, water torture and the climate crisis.

“A Sea Change in the Humanities”: joint KTH and The Posthumanities Hub Seminar with Prof. Cecilia Åsberg

Welcome to the joint event hosted by KTH Higher Seminars and The Posthumanities Hub Seminar series:

the seminar with Prof. Cecilia Åsberg (KTH/Linköping University) on:

A Sea Change in the Humanities

The seminar takes place on 28th September 2020 at 13:15 – 15:00.

For more how to access the online event, see: https://www.kth.se/en/abe/inst/philhist/historia/2.78498/hogreseminarium

Photo: Marietta Radomska

Abstract:

All through the extended history of Earth, the coast line has been a zone of unrest where waves and tides have forged life and land on this planet. Despite sudden changes to our oceanic environments, the wrack zone by the edge of the sea with its kelp forests, mussel beds, flotsam and jetsam, remains a strange and beautiful place (as noted by Rachel Carson). This is one of the starting points for the research in the oceanic (environmental) humanities project, Sea Change. Another starting point is the possibilities for cooking, curing and curating with kelp explored at Lofoten International Arts Festival in 2019, the artistic duo Cooking Sections (and their exhibition 2021 at Bonniers Kunsthall), and that we are now entering the declared UN Decade of the Oceans (2021-2030). Sea Change  is a knowledge- and capacity-building project for feminist posthumanities, aiming to connect science with art, humanities and local people so to catalyze societal transformation on low trophic ways of eating, socializing and thinking, together. 

Bio:

Cecilia Åsberg, PhD, Guest Professor of STS, Gender and Environment at KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm; Professor of Gender, Nature, Culture at Linköping University, and since 2008 founding director of the Posthumanities Hub. In 2005 she was the first to defend a PhD in Gender Studies in Sweden (a feminist science study on the popular imaginary of the new genetics), and in 2013 she inaugurated environmental humanities in The Seed Box (Mistra-Formas) research programme as Founding Director. Åsberg has attracted over €6 million in grants for her team; supervised 14 PhD students; published extensively (in Swedish, Dutch, English); given talks and taught gender studies, EH, STS, and posthumanities to BA-MA and PhD students in various positions at a range of international universities, incl Lancaster U, Utrecht Utrecht, NL, and as Fellow of Rachel Carson Centre, LMU, Germany. 

Recent publications (in 2020) include: 

The Kelp Congress book has been published!

The Kelp Congress book has now been published and officially launched! Check out this post by Marietta Radomska and of course The Kelp Congress website itself!

Marietta Radomska

The Kelp Congress, 2020. Front cover and ‘Methodologies of Kelp’ chapter by C. Åsberg, J. Holmstedt and M. Radomska (title page).

Last month the book The KelpCongress (in English) / Tangboka (in Norwegian), edited by Hilde Mehti, Neal Cahoon and Annette Wolfsberger, was published by NNKS Press (Nordnorsk kunstnersenter). The volume contains contributions by the participants of the Kelp Congress, an event forming part of Lofoten International Art Festival, which took place in September 2019. Among many brilliant chapters by artists and researchers you may also find an essay by Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt and myself, entitled ‘Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement’.

For more info on how to order the book, see The Kelp Congress website.

More on the book itself:

Assembled from a collection of Nordic, international, and multispecies perspectives, The Kelp…

View original post 357 more words

Streaming STREAMS: now available online!

STREAMS is an international conference for the Environmental Humanities (EH) that gathers researchers from a wide range of academic disciplines as well as artists, activists and practitioners. It takes place on 3-5 August 2021 in Stockholm.

Yet, as you may know from our previous post, already this year you could join a virtual event (ahead of the next year’s conference on location): Streaming STREAMS, which was held last week (5-7 Aug).

If you missed it, we strongly encourage you to check out the recordings of all the wonderful conversations and talks available on KTH Environmental Humanities Lab Youtube channel.

Last, but not least, The Posthumanities Hub also presented the trailer “The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA” (with contributors: Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt, Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren and Marietta Radomska) for the next year’s stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures.

About the trailer:

To whet your appetite for the many affordances of feminist posthumanities and multispecies futures and the more-than-human arts – collected under of the streams of this conference in 2021 – this trailer will take you on a journey via Art Lab Gnesta. Here you will get to know some of the people and projects of The Posthumanities Hub. You get to meet artists, archaeologist, feminist philosophers and environmental humanities people like Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren, Janna Holmstedt, Marietta Radomska and Cecilia Åsberg. 

Prepare to submerge, and visit exposures that catalyse and cultivate a range of stories on thinking, eating and socializing for multispecies futures together with The Posthumanities Hub, and …

You can watch it here:

The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA
– Trailer for the stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures

Environmental Justice Resources Online!

The Environment & Society Portal team, together with alumni fellows Malcom Ferdinand, Rob Gioielli, and our new RCC editor Kristy Henderson, created the new site Environmental Justice Resources Online, in order to highlight digital resources related to environmental justice and environmental racism. Please circulate widely!

As with their site Pandemics in Context, the Environment & Society Portal aims to point its users around the world to resources freely accessible without subscription or login. They invite you to have a look at both pages and send (portal@carsoncenter.lmu.de) your recommendations for freely available digital readings and multimedia resources–and remind us of your important publications we may have missed.

STAY TOGETHER APART – AND A CRISIS QUOTE OF THE DAY 

“As far as the posthuman debate is concerned, there are no grounds for plunging into melancholy metaphysical ruminations about the end of the world. We need energizing projects that express generative narratives and do not wallow in the rhetoric of crisis. Especially when the crisis in question is to a certain extent the lament of white European cultures feeling vulnerable after they have become aware of how anthropogenic global risks are likely to affect them. They need to develop some decolonial perspective.”  Rosi Braidotti (2019: 69) on the role of the humanities and its crisis in Posthuman Knowledge (Polity Press)

At the height of the COVID-19 crisis in the Swedish medical system, it might appear hard-hearted to urge us all to not wallow in the melancholia of crisis. However, the energizing projects Braidotti refers to, and we add, the societal collaborations presently exercised in the most surprising places, is exactly what is needed now in society at large. Take the environmental humanities, medical humanities, technohumanities, bioart, collaborative natural sciences and their convergences internationally: many of us have persistently called for radical socioeconomic change, and now we are faced with just that. At a large scale. It is just that it happened in a way that we are not in a position to easily absorb just yet. Theory can wait, slow as it is at its best.

Clearly the impact of COVID-19 is a significant challenge – especially in relation to the vastness of what we do not know, and the humbleness called for by that insight. Yet also, the impact of COVID-19 also takes us to the threshold of societal re-assessments, reimaginings and new beginnings. And we are swiftly learning new things about ourselves, about how we can “stay together apart (in the trouble)” with social distancing and solidarity. (If we can play with the conceptual work of Donna Haraway and Karen Barad).  Let us all continue with care, concern and curiosity with one-another.  In this there is hope. Call someone you have not talked to for a while, check in with your students, PhD students, or old supervisors, volunteer at the hospital, do shopping for the elderly or other vulnerable members of society, tend to your garden, and focus the force on the piles of books you have always wanted to read.

The world is changing, again, but it is not coming to an end.

Stay safe and well in there!!

Cecilia, Janna and Marietta for The Posthumanities Hub

Off the Beaten Track – Perspectives from the Anthropology of Aging

Within the Off the Beaten Track field school in the summer of 2020 in Gozo, Malta, there will be a second edition of a thematic unit revolving around Gender and Fieldwork.

All info can be found on the website: www.anthropologyfieldschool.org

The aim of the Gender and Fieldwork unit is to collaboratively unpack and explore gender issues, while offering a social scientific and ethnographic exploration of gender as a phenomenon through roundtable discussions and collective analysis of specific issues that emerge from our personal, self-developed in-field projects. This flexible method allows us to tailor the sessions according to the level, the needs and ambitions of each participant. Inscribed in the pedagogical approach of the summerschool I aim for a profound learning process established through experiential learning, fieldwork, interdisciplinary cooperation and close personal mentoring.

Please feel free to forward this announcement to students or programs you think would be interested.

Contact Xin Pan if you have any further questions: xin.pan[at]xpeditions.be
Project Leader of the Expeditions’ Gender & Fieldwork Unit

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Toxic/Trans/Bodies” – new date TBA (Feb 2021)

Welcome to The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Toxic/Trans/Bodies” with speakers Andria Nyberg Forshage (writer, poet and theorist based in Stockholm, SE) and dr Wibke Straube (Karlstad University, SE)!

When: Feb 2021

Where: online

 

More info:

t4t4t4t4t: Fourfold Sex and Trans-Individuation at the End of the World

by Andria Nyberg Forshage

Abstract

At present, 20th-century notions of bodily immune systems modelled as repressive-productive sovereign border controls — and vice versa — are at once being superseded, obsolesced, reinforced and reinvigorated as perhaps never before. At the same time, 21st-century notions of desiring-productive, flexible, molecular immuno-security, already dated as hyper-modern, are being folded into and onto any imaginable kind of body, society, or network. In terms of data, flesh, sex, nation, sense-making, resource extraction, ecological disaster, and ongoing resistance, it is at once a situation of planetary global or civil war, armed peace, state of emergency, and stasis.  

Departing from a scenario of societal collapse following transgender bioterrorism on a hormonal and molecular scale as imagined in Torrey Peters’ sci-fi novella Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones (2016), this talk explores the drift of t4t desiring-machines in and through the bodies, farms, fields and factories of contemporary and imagined pharmacopornographic capitalism. Where t4t designates trans for trans desire, in the trans woman commune the logograph becomes self-replicating as desire and senseless noise, burnt and embedded through fleshy, tranimal metabolism. 

Connecting the fourfold of subjectivation as theorised by Gilles Deleuze in Foucault (1988) with the t4t fourfold complexes of infectious human-animal-societal undoings, as developed through a reading of Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones, how might t4t4t4t4t be understood as an operation-operator of what Gilbert Simondon has termed the transindividual?

Bio

Andria Nyberg Forshage is a writer, theorist and poet, part of the editorial team for the Paletten Art Journal and currently working with the Knowledge Hub at Public Art Agency Sweden. She has previously presented research at conferences including the First International Trans*Studies Conference at the University of Arizona and The First International Queer Death Studies Conference at Karlstad University. They have a room of their own in Stockholm and a Scorpio rising.

 

Chemicals, endocrine disruptors and unruly bodies in trans and queer art

by Wibke Straube

Abstract:

In 2018, the post of a vegan group on facebook went viral which argued, that trans and queer bodies are the “damaged” outcome of environmental pollution and endocrine disruption by POP. The post argued further that to lobby for trans and gay rights would mean to support a capitalist, exploitative system of ecological destruction. In response other vegans and this group in particular, dismissed this (cishetero)econormative position and argued this is merely one individual’s opinion. In my talk, I would like to firstly address this “singular” opinion and unpack the idea of the trans and intersex bodies as a result of endocrine disrupting chemical. I will to do this by considering the trans and intersex body as bodily entangled with environmental pollution and toxic contamination (Ah-King/Hayward 2014; DiChiro 2010; Pollock 2016). Secondly, and most centrally, I explore how endocrine disrupting toxins emerge in trans and queer art, intoxicate art practices and artistic bodies, and foster creative pollution that subverts the gender binary norms of EDC discourses and reclaims the toxic body as a monstrous, alien becoming through and within Otherness.

Bio:

Wibke Straube, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Gender Studies, Karlstad University, SE. Their work focuses on intersectional analysis of trans, non-binary and queer embodiment, affective methodologies and the affinities of different socially marginalised bodies, their forms of survival and possibilities to create zones of liveability. They have published in Environmental Humanities and NORMA International Journal for Masculinity Studies, among others. E-mail: wibke.straube[at]kau.se

CLIMAVORE – How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

Cooking Sections: CLIMAVORE On Tidal Zones, 2018.
Performance part of Meetings on Art, La Biennale di Venezia – Biennale Arte 2019, November 2019. Credit Marco Franceschin. Courtesy Delfina Foundation and Arts Council England.

As part of The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series, we are exited to present Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe), a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London exploring how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Don’t miss this opportunity to cross the boundaries between visual arts, science, architecture, ecology and geopolitics with us!
Curator Caroline Elgh Klingborg from Bonniers konsthall will also join the discussion.

When: 4th March, 13:15-15
Where: in the big seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH (Teknikringen 74 D, Level 5, Stockholm).
Facebook

Also, another event 4th March, 18:00 at Bonniers konsthall: Cooking Sections in conversation with Daniel Lindvall and Caroline Elgh Klingborg.
Read more the talk at Bonniers konsthall


ABOUT THE SEMINAR:
How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

CLIMAVORE is a long-term project initiated by Cooking Sections in 2015. It sets out to envision seasons of food production and consumption that react to human-induced climatic events and landscape alterations. Different from the now obsolete cycle of spring, summer, autumn and winter, CLIMAVORE rethinks the construction of space and infrastructure by focusing on how climate alterations offer a new set of clues to adapt our diet to them. Unexpected climatic phenomena, like subsidence, flash floods or drought, may span minutes, days, months, years or centuries. CLIMAVORE is then proposed as a form of devouring following their effects on anthropogenic landscapes. Unlike carnivore, omnivore, locavore, vegetarian or vegan, CLIMAVORE is not only about the origin of ingredients, but also about the agency that those ingredients have in providing spatial and infrastructural responses to human-induced climatic events for a certain period of time. At the core is to embrace a flexible form of eating, shifting, for instance, to drought resistant crops in a period of water scarcity or filter feeders during times of polluted or acidified waters.

For the upcoming exhibition at Bonniers Konsthall, Cooking Sections will continue to explore how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Building on the work developed on the Isle of Skye in the past years CLIMAVORE is seeking to divest away from intensive salmon farming and develop regenerative aquacultures. The exhibition will be an opportunity to explore the role of salmon in the Scandinavian context, the construction of salmon as an invented synthetic colour and artificial species, and the toll its farming and production of feed pellets takes on communities in countries such as Peru, Chile and Senegal. Furthermore a new project will look into histories of runoff and expand the understanding of eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, as a way to address the changing relations between the human and the non-human, the natural and the cultural.

To learn more about CLIMAVORE click here or watch a short film.


About Cooking Sections Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe) is a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London. It was born to explore the systems that organise the WORLD through FOOD. Using installation, performance, mapping and video, their research-based practice explores the overlapping boundaries between visual arts, architecture, ecology and geopolitics. In 2016 they opened The Empire Remains Shop, a platform to critically speculate on implications of selling the remains of Empire today. Their first book about the project was published by Columbia Books on Architecture and the City.

Cooking Sections was part of the exhibition at the U.S. Pavilion, 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. Their work has also been exhibited at the 13th Sharjah Biennial; Manifesta12, Palermo; Lafayette Anticipations, Paris; Serpentine Galleries, London; Atlas Arts, Skye; Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Storefront for Art & Architecture, New York; Peggy Guggenheim Collection; HKW Berlin; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; and have been residents in The Politics of Food at Delfina Foundation, London. Their work has been featured in a number of international publications (Lars Müller, Sternberg Press, Volume, Frieze Magazine amongst others). They currently lead a studio unit at the Royal College of Art, London. They have recently been awarded the Special Prize at the 2019 Future Generation Art Prize and are nominated for the Visible Award.