The Kelp Congress book has been published!

The Kelp Congress book has now been published and officially launched! Check out this post by Marietta Radomska and of course The Kelp Congress website itself!

Marietta Radomska

The Kelp Congress, 2020. Front cover and ‘Methodologies of Kelp’ chapter by C. Åsberg, J. Holmstedt and M. Radomska (title page).

Last month the book The KelpCongress (in English) / Tangboka (in Norwegian), edited by Hilde Mehti, Neal Cahoon and Annette Wolfsberger, was published by NNKS Press (Nordnorsk kunstnersenter). The volume contains contributions by the participants of the Kelp Congress, an event forming part of Lofoten International Art Festival, which took place in September 2019. Among many brilliant chapters by artists and researchers you may also find an essay by Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt and myself, entitled ‘Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement’.

For more info on how to order the book, see The Kelp Congress website.

More on the book itself:

Assembled from a collection of Nordic, international, and multispecies perspectives, The Kelp…

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Streaming STREAMS: now available online!

STREAMS is an international conference for the Environmental Humanities (EH) that gathers researchers from a wide range of academic disciplines as well as artists, activists and practitioners. It takes place on 3-5 August 2021 in Stockholm.

Yet, as you may know from our previous post, already this year you could join a virtual event (ahead of the next year’s conference on location): Streaming STREAMS, which was held last week (5-7 Aug).

If you missed it, we strongly encourage you to check out the recordings of all the wonderful conversations and talks available on KTH Environmental Humanities Lab Youtube channel.

Last, but not least, The Posthumanities Hub also presented the trailer “The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA” (with contributors: Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt, Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren and Marietta Radomska) for the next year’s stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures.

About the trailer:

To whet your appetite for the many affordances of feminist posthumanities and multispecies futures and the more-than-human arts – collected under of the streams of this conference in 2021 – this trailer will take you on a journey via Art Lab Gnesta. Here you will get to know some of the people and projects of The Posthumanities Hub. You get to meet artists, archaeologist, feminist philosophers and environmental humanities people like Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren, Janna Holmstedt, Marietta Radomska and Cecilia Åsberg. 

Prepare to submerge, and visit exposures that catalyse and cultivate a range of stories on thinking, eating and socializing for multispecies futures together with The Posthumanities Hub, and …

You can watch it here:

The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA
– Trailer for the stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures

STREAMS online 5-7 August! The Posthumanities Hub will host a live session 6 August

Photo: Signe Johannessen

STREAMS, an international conference for the Environmental Humanities (EH), seeks to offer a space in which the experimental and dynamic field of EH can meet, discuss and set out future directions for thinking and acting amidst the ongoing ecological disaster.

The next upcoming event is Streaming STREAMS, 5–7 August 2020, where several presentations are streamed live.

Welcome to join the entire Streaming Streams, with conversations and trailers, and The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA, 6 August 14:00-15:00

The conference STREAMS will be held in Stockholm, 3–7 August 2021.

Braiding Friction | biofriction

It is our great pleasure to announce details about the upcoming online event series ‘Braiding Friction’, conceived by the Biofriction network with Hangar.org, Cultivamos CulturaGalerija Kapelica / Kapelica Gallery and Bioart Society . As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and postponed activities, Biofriction has set up a series of Working Groups and online events. The aim is to answer to the need of an informed discussion on the science and politics of the pandemic and the possible role of artists and researchers, to unpack and understand the enormous complexity we are confronted with. The group hosted by the Bioart Society is called Non-Living Queerings and consists of philosopher Marietta Radomska, biologist Markus Schmidt, and artists and researchers Terike Haapoja, Margherita Pevere, and Mayra Citlalli Rojo Gómez. The launch event which will introduce all groups will take place on 2nd of June 18h (CET) with consecutive public events following. For more, see Biofricition website.

CLIMAVORE – How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

Cooking Sections: CLIMAVORE On Tidal Zones, 2018.
Performance part of Meetings on Art, La Biennale di Venezia – Biennale Arte 2019, November 2019. Credit Marco Franceschin. Courtesy Delfina Foundation and Arts Council England.

As part of The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series, we are exited to present Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe), a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London exploring how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Don’t miss this opportunity to cross the boundaries between visual arts, science, architecture, ecology and geopolitics with us!
Curator Caroline Elgh Klingborg from Bonniers konsthall will also join the discussion.

When: 4th March, 13:15-15
Where: in the big seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH (Teknikringen 74 D, Level 5, Stockholm).
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Also, another event 4th March, 18:00 at Bonniers konsthall: Cooking Sections in conversation with Daniel Lindvall and Caroline Elgh Klingborg.
Read more the talk at Bonniers konsthall


ABOUT THE SEMINAR:
How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

CLIMAVORE is a long-term project initiated by Cooking Sections in 2015. It sets out to envision seasons of food production and consumption that react to human-induced climatic events and landscape alterations. Different from the now obsolete cycle of spring, summer, autumn and winter, CLIMAVORE rethinks the construction of space and infrastructure by focusing on how climate alterations offer a new set of clues to adapt our diet to them. Unexpected climatic phenomena, like subsidence, flash floods or drought, may span minutes, days, months, years or centuries. CLIMAVORE is then proposed as a form of devouring following their effects on anthropogenic landscapes. Unlike carnivore, omnivore, locavore, vegetarian or vegan, CLIMAVORE is not only about the origin of ingredients, but also about the agency that those ingredients have in providing spatial and infrastructural responses to human-induced climatic events for a certain period of time. At the core is to embrace a flexible form of eating, shifting, for instance, to drought resistant crops in a period of water scarcity or filter feeders during times of polluted or acidified waters.

For the upcoming exhibition at Bonniers Konsthall, Cooking Sections will continue to explore how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Building on the work developed on the Isle of Skye in the past years CLIMAVORE is seeking to divest away from intensive salmon farming and develop regenerative aquacultures. The exhibition will be an opportunity to explore the role of salmon in the Scandinavian context, the construction of salmon as an invented synthetic colour and artificial species, and the toll its farming and production of feed pellets takes on communities in countries such as Peru, Chile and Senegal. Furthermore a new project will look into histories of runoff and expand the understanding of eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, as a way to address the changing relations between the human and the non-human, the natural and the cultural.

To learn more about CLIMAVORE click here or watch a short film.


About Cooking Sections Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe) is a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London. It was born to explore the systems that organise the WORLD through FOOD. Using installation, performance, mapping and video, their research-based practice explores the overlapping boundaries between visual arts, architecture, ecology and geopolitics. In 2016 they opened The Empire Remains Shop, a platform to critically speculate on implications of selling the remains of Empire today. Their first book about the project was published by Columbia Books on Architecture and the City.

Cooking Sections was part of the exhibition at the U.S. Pavilion, 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. Their work has also been exhibited at the 13th Sharjah Biennial; Manifesta12, Palermo; Lafayette Anticipations, Paris; Serpentine Galleries, London; Atlas Arts, Skye; Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Storefront for Art & Architecture, New York; Peggy Guggenheim Collection; HKW Berlin; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; and have been residents in The Politics of Food at Delfina Foundation, London. Their work has been featured in a number of international publications (Lars Müller, Sternberg Press, Volume, Frieze Magazine amongst others). They currently lead a studio unit at the Royal College of Art, London. They have recently been awarded the Special Prize at the 2019 Future Generation Art Prize and are nominated for the Visible Award.

Multispecies Communication at Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam, with Janna Holmstedt

Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam, 21st February, 17:00-18:30

As part of Zoönomic Futures – an immersive workshop on ethics for a society that is no longer human-centric – The Posthumanities Hub researcher and artist Janna Holmstedt will present her talk Follow the Blind, Mimic a Worm, and Listen to the Tangle. The talk will be followed by a conversation with Anne van Leeuwen (board member at the Embassy of the North Sea) and Het Nieuwe Instituut researcher Klaas Kuitenbrouwer.

Read more here!

Zoönomic Futures is part of a series exploring Multispecies Urbanism, one of the themes of the Dutch contribution to the 17th Venice Architecture Biennale.

Exhibition and program of The Age of Entanglements

TheAge_of-exhibition

Welcome to the exhibition and program of The Age of Entanglements:

  • Open daily, Feb 3-9, Mon-Fri 10-18, Sat-Sun 11-16, Volvo Studio, Kungsträdgården
  • Wednesday 5/2  Panel Talk, Drinks & Mingle: Designing for a Symbiotic Revolution – Space Corals, Mother Cultures and Extremophiles: Presented by Franska Institutet Stockholm. Note! At Bio Capitol, Sankt Eriksgatan 82. Doors open at 17, cost 50 kr, rsvp: se https://www.capitolbio.se/filmerochbiljetter/1060/
  • Thursday 6/2 Guided Tour & Performance: Exploring Alternative Systems: An upside-down Ecology, Mutualism and Personhood for Mars:  Volvo Studio at 16:00 – 17:30 
  • 3-9/2 Design Performance: The End of the World, every day at Volvo Studio (for details, see nonagency Facebook)

Link to more info, see Stockholm Design Week 20 guide here.

See all Fb-events here.

The project is funded by Kulturbryggan.

Please feel free to spread this information and invite all your friends!

Highlights from Poetics of Future Work now online

If you weren’t able to come but are interested in what happened on the 6th of December at the Poetics of Future Work event in Stockholm, below you find a link where you can see the introduction and panel discussion.
Don’t miss the retro-futuristic country-inspired Love Song! It kind of sticks (“You can’t digitize this”).

Film at Vimeo opens in new tab:

00:00 – Welcome by JP Iversen (CIO, Electrolux)
02:10 – Introduction by project leader Nina Bozic (senior researcher and innovation enabler at RISE)
9:50 – A retro-futuristic Love Song between a cowboy and an AI girl, written and performed by Dragana Zarevska (artist) and Andi Kravljaca (digital strategist, Nacka Municipality), inspired by the future work scenarios created in DIGI Futures project.
20:48 – Panel discussion on the future of work with Tove Chevalley (Digital Innovation Director, Electrolux), Janna Holmstedt (artist and researcher, the Posthumanities Hub at KTH), Sandor Albrecht (Vice President, AI@RISE & Wallenberg Launch Pad) and Per Johansson (speaker, writer and visionary consultant), hosted by Nina Bozic.

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar with Prof. Patricia MacCormack, 30th January 2020, 13:15-15:00, KTH

Manifesto

Welcome to the first Posthumanities Hub event in 2020 – the seminar with Prof. Patricia MacCormack (Anglia Ruskin University, UK) on A Joyful Apocalypse: Activism for the End of the Anthropocene.

When: 30th January, 13:15 – 15:00

Where: the seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm (Teknikringen 74 D, Stockholm).

Facebook event

OBS! Please REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT by sending an email to: the.posthumanities.hub[at]gmail.com

Abstract:

To end the anthropocene  is a call to activism at a time where ways of living seem impossible to proscribe and the world’s many urban and natural environments and organisms are increasingly transforming, some becoming more vulnerable while others increase their exertion of power over global systems of information and control. During these ages it can be difficult to imagine new and multiple ways of existing where hopelessness and imagination exist simultaneously. Beyond the Posthuman, but firmly within this world, my concept of the Ahuman acknowledges we aren’t nonhuman, but devalues the term human and its thus far devastating consequences for the world in order to suggest vitalistic, perhaps even optimistic, ways to negotiate some of the difficulties in thinking and acting in a world where meaning and reality are tentative but material actuality and lives (of all varieties) are in need of novel modes of intervention and interaction for the liberation and creative freedom of all organisms and the ecology of the Earth as a whole. Collapsing activism, artistic practice and affirmative ethics, while introducing some radical contemporary ideas such as human extinction and vegan abolition this paper navigates the ways in which we must compose the human differently, specifically beyond nihilism and post – and trans-humanism and outside human privilege. This is in order to actively think and live with connectivity (actual not virtual), viscerally, with passion and grace, toward a new world. The irony of the apocalypse is that the world continues nonetheless.  How can we live more ethically? How can the end of the human (even the posthuman) mean the end of human privilege as that which assists in opening the world to all life and to the human apocalypse being the birth of the world through deep ecology?

Bio:

Patricia MacCormack is Professor of Continental Philosophy at Anglia Ruskin University. She is the author of Cinesexuality (2008), Posthuman Ethics (2012) and The Ahuman Manifesto (2020), the editor of The Animal Catalyst: Toward Ahuman Theory (2014) and the co-editor of Deleuze and the Schizoanalysis of Cinema (2008), Deleuze and the Animal (2017) and Ecosophical Aesthetics (2018). She publishes extensively in the posthuman, queer theory, animal studies, horror film, and Continental Philosophy.

The event is organised in collaboration with the Konstfack Research Week 2020 – see the detailed programme here.