Gender Studies Conference 12-13 Nov 2020 (online), keynotes and programme is out!

Keynote speakers:

Cecilia Åsberg – More-than-human feminisms, and sea changes
KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Linköping University, Sweden

Roman Kuhar – Anti-gender movements across Europe and beyond
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Kyla Schuller – The Future of Gender: Rethinking the Sex/Gender Distinction
Rutgers University, USA

The 2020 Gender Studies conference explores futures as matters of intense politics, imaginings and debates from feminist and intersectional perspectives. The conference theme, “reclaiming futures”, suggests that how futures are envisioned, enacted and contested, in the present and in the past, has significant implications for equality and social justice and the very possibilities of a livable and just world. The conference asks what kinds of feminist and intersectional engagements with possible futures have emerged, are emerging, or may be imagined. We hope to investigate collectively the implications of the ongoing social, political and environmental changes for the future of gender studies and feminist politics.

Read more here: https://events.tuni.fi/genderstudiesconference2020/speakers/

Environmental Racism is Garbage! Symposium – Call for Submissions, deadline 30 Nov, 2020

Submission Deadline:  30 November 2020  
Symposium: 27-29 May 2021  

The aim of this interactive virtual research-creation and art symposium is to bear modest witness to waste as a symptom of environmental racism. At least one billion people live in over a quarter of a million slums worldwide, often with no formal waste or sanitation infrastructure or services (Davis 2007). And in economically affluent countries, landfills and other waste management systems are most often sited in or close to poor and racialized communities (for example, Amegah and Jaakkola 2016; Furedy 1993; Mothiba, Moja, and Loans 2017; Parizeau 2006) who bear a disproportionate burden of persistent exposure to the risks, hazards and contamination of pollution (Hird in press; Hird and Zahara 2016). 

Environmental Racism is Garbage seeks knowledge production and acts of resistance at the intersection of art, politics, and the relationship between racialized injustice and ecological crisis. We invite contributions and collaborations from visual and performance-based artists, curators, theorists and activists, to create submissions that engage with the interconnections between environmental health, socio-economic conditions, racialized discrimination, social justice. We are interested in new or recent work in any medium that could be displayed in a browser. Transdisciplinary work driven by creative inquiry and lived experience will be forefronted.

This virtual (web-based) symposium will be synchronous and asynchronous and feature artwork displayed in the browser as well as keynote speakers, discussion panels and other additions. The symposium will be archived on a dedicated website.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Project description and [technical] requirements for displaying (online), including artist/author statement (2 pages maximum).
  2. Supporting documentation: i.e. maximum 5 images, 1 (3 min or under) video clip or sound recording sample.
  3. Current CV (3 pages maximum) for all team members
  4. Artist/author/activist/curator/theorist biography for all team members (maximum 100 words each)

Please submit your work through this form by November 30, 2020. Submissions will be reviewed by a transdisciplinary panel including members of The Seedbox Consortium, Canada’s Waste Flow, and Queen’s University. 

Priority will be given to applicants who are Indigenous, Black, people of colour, women, LGBTQ2+, people with disabilities, and/or are members of other equity-seeking groups.

Each project selected will receive a payment of $1000 CAD and another $500 CAD per additional artist, for a total of up to $2000 CAD per submission. Project Fees will be paid after completion of the symposium. Details of the post-symposium publication to follow.
The full call for submission can be found here
Please submit projects here by November 30th, 2020  

We invite you to share this call with colleagues who might be interested, and direct any questions to: help@environmentalracismisgarbage.art

Streaming STREAMS: now available online!

STREAMS is an international conference for the Environmental Humanities (EH) that gathers researchers from a wide range of academic disciplines as well as artists, activists and practitioners. It takes place on 3-5 August 2021 in Stockholm.

Yet, as you may know from our previous post, already this year you could join a virtual event (ahead of the next year’s conference on location): Streaming STREAMS, which was held last week (5-7 Aug).

If you missed it, we strongly encourage you to check out the recordings of all the wonderful conversations and talks available on KTH Environmental Humanities Lab Youtube channel.

Last, but not least, The Posthumanities Hub also presented the trailer “The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA” (with contributors: Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt, Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren and Marietta Radomska) for the next year’s stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures.

About the trailer:

To whet your appetite for the many affordances of feminist posthumanities and multispecies futures and the more-than-human arts – collected under of the streams of this conference in 2021 – this trailer will take you on a journey via Art Lab Gnesta. Here you will get to know some of the people and projects of The Posthumanities Hub. You get to meet artists, archaeologist, feminist philosophers and environmental humanities people like Signe Johannessen, Christina Fredengren, Janna Holmstedt, Marietta Radomska and Cecilia Åsberg. 

Prepare to submerge, and visit exposures that catalyse and cultivate a range of stories on thinking, eating and socializing for multispecies futures together with The Posthumanities Hub, and …

You can watch it here:

The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA
– Trailer for the stream Feminist Posthumanities – More-than-human Arts and Multispecies Futures

Call for contributions: New Materialist Informatics – 11th International New Materialisms Conference

23-25 March 2021

University of Kassel, Germany

Deadline for Submission: October 15, 2020

www.uni-kassel.de/go/NMI2021

This 11th new materialist conference invites participants to investigate the possible intersections between, and beyond, new materialism and informatics. How can new materialism and informatics be brought together in ways that help build liveable and sustainable techno-lifeworlds? What new perspectives with regard to contemporary crises might emerge at such intersection and beyond? What kind of conceptual and methodological tools are needed for new materialist informatics design and research? This conference wishes to include and go beyond the new materialist readings of computing and computational artefacts and generate innovative perspectives on how techno-worldings can be performed from a new materialist perspective.

Extended deadline to Aug 15: EKO 2020 Conference – Literature, Environment and Sustainability

Information will follow in Swedish, updated information is available at: https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/eko-2020-litteraturvetenskap-miljo-och-hallbarhet

Med anledning av Covid-19: konferensen kommer att hållas, antingen på plats i Göteborg eller i en digital version, 3-4 december 2020, men tiden för inlämning av anmälningar och förslag på papers, paneler, workshops eller andra presentationer har förlängts till den 15 augusti 2020.

EKO 2020 – Litteraturvetenskap, miljö och hållbarhet

Litteraturvetenskaplig ämneskonferens vid institutionen för litteratur, idéhistoria och litteratur, Göteborgs universitet, den 3-4 december 2020.

Kring oss har orden “miljö” och “klimat” fått en ny akut klang, och bildar allt oftare prefix till ord som “ångest” och “förnekelse” likaväl som “aktivism” och “smarthet”.

Även inom litteraturvetenskapen vinner forskningsuppgifter som fokuserar på ekologi, natur, miljö, klimat och planetens framtid alltmer mark. Ekokritiska, posthumanistiska och icke-antropocentriska perspektiv driver och kompletterar därtill annan forskning med mål att styra mot en hållbar framtid.

Med konferensen EKO2020 inbjuder vi paperpresentationer, paneldebatter, presentationer och diskussioner som förutsättningslöst inventerar litteraturvetenskapen och dess anknytning till en miljötematik i vid mening.

Litteraturvetenskapen har redan en rik palett med redskap, metoder och frågeställningar som problematiserar människans relationer inbördes såväl som till omgivningen, textens förhållande till verkligheten, kritiska perspektiv som granskar den historiska utvecklingen och teknologierna samt perspektiv som behandlar olika litterära formers estetiska och politiska funktion, för att bara nämna några övergripande fält.

Förutom att framhäva vedertagna metoder, frågeställningar och begrepp i en grönare världs tjänst finns också behov av vetenskaplig förnyelse. Hur kan metoder, frågor och inte minst historieskrivning se ut som bättre utforskar, adresserar och representerar miljö- och hållbarhetsfrågor inom litteraturvetenskapen?

Plenarföreläsare:

Professor Timothy Morton, Rice University, USA, författare till bl.a. Ecology without Nature (2007), Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence (2016), Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People (2017) och Being Ecological (2018) m.fl.

Professor Erin James, University of Idaho, författare till The Storyworld Accord: Econarratology and Postcolonial Narratives (2015).

Professor Serenella Iovino, gästforskare vid University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill och har gett ut Material Ecocriticism (2014) och är organisatör för EASLCE.

Morton, James och Iovino kommer att vara med oss på digital länk. Efter föreläsningarna kommer det att finnas möjlighet att diskutera och ställa frågor till föreläsarna. Även andra intresserade kommer att kunna anmäla sig att delta på dessa föreläsningar.

Inlägg kan exempelvis anknyta till något av följande men är inte begränsade till:

• Natur-, miljö- och materialitetsskildringar
• Ekopoesi och topopoetik
• Cli-fi, dystopi och postapokalyptiska visioner
• Utopiforskning
• Idylldiktning
• Miljörättvisa
• Affektstudier
• Miljö och teknologi
• Biosemiotik
• Litteraturens kulturella ekologi och läsarorienterade perspektiv
• Slow research/science
• Ekomarxism
• Postkolonial ekokritik
• Dark ecology
• Blå ekokritik/litterär thalassologi
• Plant narratology
• Ekofeminism, nymaterialism och material ecocriticism
• Human animal & critical animal-studies

Konferensen kommer att hållas vid Humanistiska fakulteten, Göteborgs universitet, den 3-4 december 2020 (antingen på plats eller digitalt). Vi välkomnar förslag till papers, paneler, workshops eller andra presentationer senast den 15 augusti 2020. Abstracts på 100-300 ord, inklusive specifikation om tekniska önskemål, skickas till eko2020@lir.gu.se

Doktorandworkshop

I anslutning till konferensen, den 2 december, kommer det att arrangeras en doktorandworkshop med efterföljande postseminarium. Någon av våra keynotes kommer också att medverka denna eftermiddag. Alla doktorander, oavsett litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning, är hjärtligt välkomna.

Deadine för anmälan är den 16 oktober. Frågor skickas till Johanna Lindbo: johanna.lindbo@lir.gu.se



Humanities on the Brink: Energy, Environment, Emergency. This 2020 ASLE Virtual Conference has extended the deadline for submissions to April 8, 2020

Note from the organizers, please share widely:

When we began talking about organizing a nearly carbon-neutral (NCN) symposium on how the humanities can be rethought and repurposed in an age of rapidly worsening ecosocial crises, we had no idea that a full-blown global medical emergency was just over the horizon. The past several weeks have brought into further relief the necessity of building academic infrastructures outside of conventional conference formats. Furthermore, COVID-19 is testing our academic institutions and societies in ways that will offer many lessons as the humanities respond to longer-term issues, particularly the climate crisis and the spread of authoritarianism. In order to accommodate both those who have been affected by the pandemic and those who are interested in contributing abstracts focusing on what the “emergency humanities” can bring to the fight against the new coronavirus (and, perhaps, future pandemics), we are extending the deadline for submissions to Humanities on the Brink: Energy, Environment, Emergency. We also welcome abstracts for relevant presentations that were set to be delivered at conferences that have been canceled or postponed due to the pandemic. We will now be accepting submissions until April 8.

Call for Papers: https://www.asle.org/stay-informed/asle-news/humanities-on-the-brink-energy-environment-emergency-asle-2020-virtual-symposium/

Reclaiming Futures – Gender Studies Conference 2020 Tampere University, 12-13 November 2020

Call for panels and papers closes on 31 March 2020

Prof. Cecilia Åsberg, founder and director of The Posthumanities Hub is one of the keynote speakers in this conference that explores futures as matters of intense politics, imaginings and debates from feminist and intersectional perspectives.

The range of livable futures is being shaped dramatically, and possibly permanently, by several ongoing developments. Climate change and other environmental crises are undoing the material conditions of human and more-than-human life. The rise of right-wing populist politics and attacks on feminism and gender and sexual minorities are challenging the terms in which equality, difference and justice are debated. The logics of capitalism and the neoliberalization of institutions from universities and education to health care, development and work life are shaping how some futures appear as sensible or inevitable, and others as unattainable and not worth of political struggle.

The conference theme, “reclaiming futures”, suggests that how futures are envisioned, enacted and contested, in the present and in the past, has significant implications for equality and social justice and the very possibilities of a livable and just world. The conference asks what kinds of feminist and intersectional engagements with possible futures have emerged, are emerging, or may be imagined. We hope to investigate collectively the implications of the ongoing social, political and environmental changes for the future of gender studies and feminist politics.

The conference is organized and hosted by Gender Studies at Tampere University together with the Association for Gender Studies in Finland (SUNS).

More info about the conference and call

The First International Queer Death Studies Conference: CfP deadline 30 June!

The First International Queer Death Studies Conference:
“Death Matters, Queer(ing) Mourning, Attuning to Transitionings”

4-5 NOVEMBER 2019,
KARLSTAD UNIVERSITY,
SWEDEN

Radomska - short lichen
Photo: Marietta Radomska

ORGANISERS:
Queer Death Studies Network
Centre for Gender Studies, Karlstad University
Tema Genus, Linköping University

[for CfP – see below. Deadline for abstracts: 30 June]

Official conference website: https://www.kau.se/en/centre-gender-studies/date/first-international-queer-death-studies-conference-death-matters

In the context of the current environmental crises, the degradation of natural resources transforms certain habitats into unliveable spaces, while social and economic inequalities and geopolitical, social and symbolic violence expose differential vulnerabilities of communities and individuals. Both global and local mechanisms of necropolitics (Mbembe 2003) exert their power over the lives and deaths of populations, making some deaths more grievable than others (Butler 2004). Simultaneously, unsustainable living conditions and environments contribute to increased mortality rates and the extinction of species.

While natural sciences emphasise the interdependence of human and the environment, Western cultural imaginaries keep drawing a dividing line between humans and nonhuman others, particularly visible in the context of death. The division is combined with a dual approach to death – human death in particular – namely, Western cultural frameworks tend to present human death either as a step towards a disembodied afterlife (Christian tradition), or as something to be eradicated in favour of survival (secular biomedical perspective).

Arguably, the questions of death have been present in Western philosophy since antiquity. While these perspectives explore both ontological and axiological aspects of death, they are primarily concerned with the death of human individuals, seen from the perspective of the sovereign subject. Furthermore, questions around death, human remnants and the cultural and medical aspects of dying have been studied from anthropological, sociological, historical, and psychological perspectives, next to the biomedical ones. Since its establishment as a research field in the 1970s, Death Studies has drawn attention to the questions of death, dying and mourning as complex and multifaceted phenomena that require interdisciplinary approaches.

Yet, the engagements with death, dying and mourning constitutive of conventional Death Studies’ research, have left many questions open insofar as they have often been governed by the normative notions of: the subject; continuing bonds; family relations and communities; rituals; and experiences of mourning, and bereavement. Individuals who do not fulfil the conditions of the normative idea of the human (usually imagined to be white, middle-class, heterosexual, cis-gendered, able-bodied) tend to be ignored in dominant stories on death, loss, grief and mourning. Moreover, the current environmental crisis seems to produce a growing consciousness about living in ecological and social proximities to death, which also gives rise to demands for more diverse, nuanced and inclusive stories of death, dying and mourning.

The emerging field of Queer Death Studies (QDS), which the conference creates an arena for, aims to fill these gaps in traditional Death Studies, by attending to issues of: diverse cultural, socio-political, historical, and economic conditions; entangled relations between human and the environment in the context of the Anthropocene; differential experiences of marginalised communities and individuals excluded from the hegemonic discourses on death, loss, grief and mourning, associated for example with the heteronormative model of family bonds; and, contemporary forms of necropolitics: mechanisms of power that force certain bodies into liminal spaces between life and death.

Against this background, QDS emerges as a transdisciplinary field of research that critically and (self) reflexively investigates and challenges conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by death, dying and mourning. By bringing together conceptual and analytical tools grounded in feminist materialisms and feminist theorising broadly speaking (e.g. Braidotti 2006; MacCormack 2012), queer theory (e.g. Haritaworn, Kuntsman & Posocco 2014) and decolonial critique (e.g. Fanon 1965; Mignolo 2011), QDS strives to advance methodologies and understandings that critically and creatively attend to the problem of death, dying, and mourning in the current environmental, cultural, and socio-political contexts.

In order to search for broad inspirations for alternative articulations and stories which queer, that is, unpack and question the normativities (Chen 2012; Sandilands & Erickson 2012) that often frame contemporary discourses on death, dying and mourning, The First International Queer Death Studies Conference Death Matters, Queer(ing) Mourning, Attuning to Transitionings mobilises a transdisciplinary engagement involving not only academics, but also activists, artists and other practitioners. In the context of the conference, to queer issues of death, dying and mourning means to unhinge certainties, “undo normative entanglements and fashion alternative imaginaries” beyond the exclusive concern with gender and sexuality, often associated with the term “queer” (Giffney & Hird 2008, 6). In particular, the conference calls for papers within the following three overall themes: (1) death matters and materialities, (2) queering mourning, and (3) attuning to transitionings run through both days and all keynote lectures.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Stine Willum Adrian (Aalborg University, DK) – “Stitching Stories of Broken Hearts: Rethinking technologies of Death and Dying at the Beginning of Life”

Patricia MacCormack (Anglia Ruskin University, UK) – “Embracing Death, Opening the World”

Kira O’Reilly (independent artist, Helsinki, FI),
“An un’seaming mourning
(second iteration)
a year later”

C. Riley Snorton (University of Chicago, USA) – “Mud: Queer Death and Teeming Forms of Wildlife”

CALL FOR PAPERS:

The First International Queer Death Studies Conference: “Death Matters, Queer(ing) Mourning, Attuning to Transitionings” aims to create an arena for critical discussion of death, dying and mourning that goes beyond the dual approach to death – human death in particular – that is common within Western cultural frameworks of Christian tradition or secular biomedical perspectives. As such, the conference invites scholars who work with death, dying, mourning and afterlife in relation to: diverse cultural, socio-political, historical, and economic conditions; entangled relations between human and the environment in the context of the Anthropocene; differential experiences of marginalised communities and individuals excluded from the hegemonic discourses on death, loss, grief and mourning, associated for example with the heteronormative model of family bonds; and, contemporary forms of necropolitics: mechanisms of power that force certain bodies into liminal spaces between life and death (for instance, refugees whose lives in detention camps turn into the state of “social death” (Mirzoeff 2019)). Interventions that focus on practices that resist hegemonic norms, as well as queer and decolonialise mourning and remembering are also welcome.

In order to search for broad inspirations for alternative articulations and stories which queer, that is, unpack and question the normativities (Chen 2012; Sandilands & Erickson 2012) that often frame contemporary discourses on death, dying, mourning and afterlife, the conference is based on a transdisciplinary engagement involving not only academics, but also activists, artists and other practitioners. In the context of the conference, to queer issues of death, dying, mourning and afterlife means to unhinge certainties, “undo normative entanglements and fashion alternative imaginaries” beyond the exclusive concern with gender and sexuality, often associated with the term “queer” (Giffney & Hird 2008, 6). In particular, the conference will call for papers within the following three overall themes: (1) death matters and materialities, (2) queering mourning, and (3) attuning to transitionings run through both days and all the keynote lectures.

The conference invites individual papers (length: 20 min) that engage with – but are not necessarily limited to – the following themes:

– Queer methodologies of researching death, dying, mourning and afterlife
– Queering and decolonialising practices of mourning, bereavement and remembrance
– Materiality of death and corpses
– Queering philosophies of death
– Death/life ecologies
– Necropolitics and borders
– Queer and trans necropolitics
– Un/grievable lives and deaths
– Death and biotechnology/biomedicine
– Queering cancer and other life-threatening diseases
– Suicide
-Technologies of life/death
– Queer widowhood
– Decolonialising death
– Illness narratives and death
– Ethico-politics and practices of killability
– Nonhuman death and dying
– Extinction and annihilation
– Death and acts of resistance
– ‘Slow death’
– Queering temporalities of death
– Queer spiritualities
– Death, ghosts and hauntology

Please, send a 300-word long abstract, accompanied by a 100-long bio to: qdsconference[at]gmail.com .

Deadline for abstracts: 30 June 2019

8th Biennial Conference of the European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture and Environment (EASLCE): “The Garden – Ecological Paradigms of Space, History, and Community”

The Garden Conference poster

Join the 8th Biennial Conference of the European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture and Environment (EASLCE): “The Garden – Ecological Paradigms of Space, History, and Community” at the University of Würzburg (Germany) from September 26 -29, 2018.

For more info click HERE.

Early bird registration until 31st Augst!

 

CfP:”Multispecies Storytelling in Intermedial Practice”: Conference in Växjö,

Call for Papers:

Multispecies Storytelling in Intermedial Practice“: Conference in Växjö,

January 23-25, 2019 (from Wednesday 1- pm to Friday 1 pm)

This transdisciplinary conference is hosted by the Centre for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies, Linnæus University, Sweden, in collaboration with the Laboratory of Aesthetics and Ecology, Copenhagen/Berlin.

It is generously funded by the Seed Box. Deadline for abstracts: 15 August 2018.

See the full call for papers here.

Full Multispecies Storytelling-page-001
CfP: Multispecies Storytelling