New CFP: POSTHUMANIST PERSPECTIVES ON SPACE AND SPATIALITY IN CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS

Deadline: 30 Sep, 2020.

A thematic issue of Pasavento. Review of Hispanic Studies invites to a reflection on space and spatiality in contemporary Latin American cultural expressions from a posthumanist perspective. The issue aims to gather contributions that interrogate space and spatiality in works produced at the end of the 20th century and at the beginning of the 21st century. Analysis of cultural expressions on processes of migration, urbanization and climate change related to dynamics of neocolonial extraction are especially welcome.

Researchers who wish to collaborate with an article for this volume, please visit Pasavento website for more information:

Braiding Friction | biofriction

It is our great pleasure to announce details about the upcoming online event series ‘Braiding Friction’, conceived by the Biofriction network with Hangar.org, Cultivamos CulturaGalerija Kapelica / Kapelica Gallery and Bioart Society . As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and postponed activities, Biofriction has set up a series of Working Groups and online events. The aim is to answer to the need of an informed discussion on the science and politics of the pandemic and the possible role of artists and researchers, to unpack and understand the enormous complexity we are confronted with. The group hosted by the Bioart Society is called Non-Living Queerings and consists of philosopher Marietta Radomska, biologist Markus Schmidt, and artists and researchers Terike Haapoja, Margherita Pevere, and Mayra Citlalli Rojo Gómez. The launch event which will introduce all groups will take place on 2nd of June 18h (CET) with consecutive public events following. For more, see Biofricition website.

Extended deadline to Aug 15: EKO 2020 Conference – Literature, Environment and Sustainability

Information will follow in Swedish, updated information is available at: https://lir.gu.se/forskning/konferenser/eko-2020-litteraturvetenskap-miljo-och-hallbarhet

Med anledning av Covid-19: konferensen kommer att hållas, antingen på plats i Göteborg eller i en digital version, 3-4 december 2020, men tiden för inlämning av anmälningar och förslag på papers, paneler, workshops eller andra presentationer har förlängts till den 15 augusti 2020.

EKO 2020 – Litteraturvetenskap, miljö och hållbarhet

Litteraturvetenskaplig ämneskonferens vid institutionen för litteratur, idéhistoria och litteratur, Göteborgs universitet, den 3-4 december 2020.

Kring oss har orden “miljö” och “klimat” fått en ny akut klang, och bildar allt oftare prefix till ord som “ångest” och “förnekelse” likaväl som “aktivism” och “smarthet”.

Även inom litteraturvetenskapen vinner forskningsuppgifter som fokuserar på ekologi, natur, miljö, klimat och planetens framtid alltmer mark. Ekokritiska, posthumanistiska och icke-antropocentriska perspektiv driver och kompletterar därtill annan forskning med mål att styra mot en hållbar framtid.

Med konferensen EKO2020 inbjuder vi paperpresentationer, paneldebatter, presentationer och diskussioner som förutsättningslöst inventerar litteraturvetenskapen och dess anknytning till en miljötematik i vid mening.

Litteraturvetenskapen har redan en rik palett med redskap, metoder och frågeställningar som problematiserar människans relationer inbördes såväl som till omgivningen, textens förhållande till verkligheten, kritiska perspektiv som granskar den historiska utvecklingen och teknologierna samt perspektiv som behandlar olika litterära formers estetiska och politiska funktion, för att bara nämna några övergripande fält.

Förutom att framhäva vedertagna metoder, frågeställningar och begrepp i en grönare världs tjänst finns också behov av vetenskaplig förnyelse. Hur kan metoder, frågor och inte minst historieskrivning se ut som bättre utforskar, adresserar och representerar miljö- och hållbarhetsfrågor inom litteraturvetenskapen?

Plenarföreläsare:

Professor Timothy Morton, Rice University, USA, författare till bl.a. Ecology without Nature (2007), Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence (2016), Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People (2017) och Being Ecological (2018) m.fl.

Professor Erin James, University of Idaho, författare till The Storyworld Accord: Econarratology and Postcolonial Narratives (2015).

Professor Serenella Iovino, gästforskare vid University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill och har gett ut Material Ecocriticism (2014) och är organisatör för EASLCE.

Morton, James och Iovino kommer att vara med oss på digital länk. Efter föreläsningarna kommer det att finnas möjlighet att diskutera och ställa frågor till föreläsarna. Även andra intresserade kommer att kunna anmäla sig att delta på dessa föreläsningar.

Inlägg kan exempelvis anknyta till något av följande men är inte begränsade till:

• Natur-, miljö- och materialitetsskildringar
• Ekopoesi och topopoetik
• Cli-fi, dystopi och postapokalyptiska visioner
• Utopiforskning
• Idylldiktning
• Miljörättvisa
• Affektstudier
• Miljö och teknologi
• Biosemiotik
• Litteraturens kulturella ekologi och läsarorienterade perspektiv
• Slow research/science
• Ekomarxism
• Postkolonial ekokritik
• Dark ecology
• Blå ekokritik/litterär thalassologi
• Plant narratology
• Ekofeminism, nymaterialism och material ecocriticism
• Human animal & critical animal-studies

Konferensen kommer att hållas vid Humanistiska fakulteten, Göteborgs universitet, den 3-4 december 2020 (antingen på plats eller digitalt). Vi välkomnar förslag till papers, paneler, workshops eller andra presentationer senast den 15 augusti 2020. Abstracts på 100-300 ord, inklusive specifikation om tekniska önskemål, skickas till eko2020@lir.gu.se

Doktorandworkshop

I anslutning till konferensen, den 2 december, kommer det att arrangeras en doktorandworkshop med efterföljande postseminarium. Någon av våra keynotes kommer också att medverka denna eftermiddag. Alla doktorander, oavsett litteraturvetenskaplig inriktning, är hjärtligt välkomna.

Deadine för anmälan är den 16 oktober. Frågor skickas till Johanna Lindbo: johanna.lindbo@lir.gu.se



STAY TOGETHER APART – AND A CRISIS QUOTE OF THE DAY 

“As far as the posthuman debate is concerned, there are no grounds for plunging into melancholy metaphysical ruminations about the end of the world. We need energizing projects that express generative narratives and do not wallow in the rhetoric of crisis. Especially when the crisis in question is to a certain extent the lament of white European cultures feeling vulnerable after they have become aware of how anthropogenic global risks are likely to affect them. They need to develop some decolonial perspective.”  Rosi Braidotti (2019: 69) on the role of the humanities and its crisis in Posthuman Knowledge (Polity Press)

At the height of the COVID-19 crisis in the Swedish medical system, it might appear hard-hearted to urge us all to not wallow in the melancholia of crisis. However, the energizing projects Braidotti refers to, and we add, the societal collaborations presently exercised in the most surprising places, is exactly what is needed now in society at large. Take the environmental humanities, medical humanities, technohumanities, bioart, collaborative natural sciences and their convergences internationally: many of us have persistently called for radical socioeconomic change, and now we are faced with just that. At a large scale. It is just that it happened in a way that we are not in a position to easily absorb just yet. Theory can wait, slow as it is at its best.

Clearly the impact of COVID-19 is a significant challenge – especially in relation to the vastness of what we do not know, and the humbleness called for by that insight. Yet also, the impact of COVID-19 also takes us to the threshold of societal re-assessments, reimaginings and new beginnings. And we are swiftly learning new things about ourselves, about how we can “stay together apart (in the trouble)” with social distancing and solidarity. (If we can play with the conceptual work of Donna Haraway and Karen Barad).  Let us all continue with care, concern and curiosity with one-another.  In this there is hope. Call someone you have not talked to for a while, check in with your students, PhD students, or old supervisors, volunteer at the hospital, do shopping for the elderly or other vulnerable members of society, tend to your garden, and focus the force on the piles of books you have always wanted to read.

The world is changing, again, but it is not coming to an end.

Stay safe and well in there!!

Cecilia, Janna and Marietta for The Posthumanities Hub

Humanities on the Brink: Energy, Environment, Emergency. This 2020 ASLE Virtual Conference has extended the deadline for submissions to April 8, 2020

Note from the organizers, please share widely:

When we began talking about organizing a nearly carbon-neutral (NCN) symposium on how the humanities can be rethought and repurposed in an age of rapidly worsening ecosocial crises, we had no idea that a full-blown global medical emergency was just over the horizon. The past several weeks have brought into further relief the necessity of building academic infrastructures outside of conventional conference formats. Furthermore, COVID-19 is testing our academic institutions and societies in ways that will offer many lessons as the humanities respond to longer-term issues, particularly the climate crisis and the spread of authoritarianism. In order to accommodate both those who have been affected by the pandemic and those who are interested in contributing abstracts focusing on what the “emergency humanities” can bring to the fight against the new coronavirus (and, perhaps, future pandemics), we are extending the deadline for submissions to Humanities on the Brink: Energy, Environment, Emergency. We also welcome abstracts for relevant presentations that were set to be delivered at conferences that have been canceled or postponed due to the pandemic. We will now be accepting submissions until April 8.

Call for Papers: https://www.asle.org/stay-informed/asle-news/humanities-on-the-brink-energy-environment-emergency-asle-2020-virtual-symposium/

Reclaiming Futures – Gender Studies Conference 2020 Tampere University, 12-13 November 2020

Call for panels and papers closes on 31 March 2020

Prof. Cecilia Åsberg, founder and director of The Posthumanities Hub is one of the keynote speakers in this conference that explores futures as matters of intense politics, imaginings and debates from feminist and intersectional perspectives.

The range of livable futures is being shaped dramatically, and possibly permanently, by several ongoing developments. Climate change and other environmental crises are undoing the material conditions of human and more-than-human life. The rise of right-wing populist politics and attacks on feminism and gender and sexual minorities are challenging the terms in which equality, difference and justice are debated. The logics of capitalism and the neoliberalization of institutions from universities and education to health care, development and work life are shaping how some futures appear as sensible or inevitable, and others as unattainable and not worth of political struggle.

The conference theme, “reclaiming futures”, suggests that how futures are envisioned, enacted and contested, in the present and in the past, has significant implications for equality and social justice and the very possibilities of a livable and just world. The conference asks what kinds of feminist and intersectional engagements with possible futures have emerged, are emerging, or may be imagined. We hope to investigate collectively the implications of the ongoing social, political and environmental changes for the future of gender studies and feminist politics.

The conference is organized and hosted by Gender Studies at Tampere University together with the Association for Gender Studies in Finland (SUNS).

More info about the conference and call

Off the Beaten Track – Perspectives from the Anthropology of Aging

Within the Off the Beaten Track field school in the summer of 2020 in Gozo, Malta, there will be a second edition of a thematic unit revolving around Gender and Fieldwork.

All info can be found on the website: www.anthropologyfieldschool.org

The aim of the Gender and Fieldwork unit is to collaboratively unpack and explore gender issues, while offering a social scientific and ethnographic exploration of gender as a phenomenon through roundtable discussions and collective analysis of specific issues that emerge from our personal, self-developed in-field projects. This flexible method allows us to tailor the sessions according to the level, the needs and ambitions of each participant. Inscribed in the pedagogical approach of the summerschool I aim for a profound learning process established through experiential learning, fieldwork, interdisciplinary cooperation and close personal mentoring.

Please feel free to forward this announcement to students or programs you think would be interested.

Contact Xin Pan if you have any further questions: xin.pan[at]xpeditions.be
Project Leader of the Expeditions’ Gender & Fieldwork Unit

The Physicist Dr. Ragnar Holm’s Foundation Postdoc position

KTH advertises for a Ragnar Holm postdoc position within a KTH research group.

Are you into STS, history of technology, or techno-humanities, electrics and contact-making (and contact unmakings, such as corrosion, fritting or friction) – and would want do work with us at The Posthumanities Hub of the Department of Philosophy and History? If so please contact Cecilia Åsberg urgently, cecilia.asberg[at]abe.kth.se to discuss this possibility.

NB deadline is extended to March 13, 2020.

Postdoc scholarship from Fysikern fil dr Ragnar Holms stiftelse i Kungliga Tekniska högskolan (The Physicist Dr. Ragnar Holm’s Foundation). Registration number VT-2020-0015

Application period March 2-13 2020

KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm has grown to become one of Europe’s leading technical and engineering universities, as well as a key centre of intellectual talent and innovation. We are Sweden’s largest technical research and learning institution and home to students, researchers and faculty from around the world. Our research and education covers a wide area including natural sciences and all branches of engineering, as well as architecture, industrial management, urban planning, history and philosophy.

Project description

KTH invites applications for a postdoctoral scholarship in honor of the physicist Ragnar Holm (1879-1970), regarded as the scientific founder of electric contacts and their use, and author of the book “Electric Contacts: Theory and Applications”, Hugo Gerbers Förlag 1946.

Qualifications

A successful candidate should have a PhD-degree, be of any nationality, and is expected to join an existing research group at KTH in a relatively broad field, encompassing Engineering Physics and related subjects, or the History of Science and Technology. Preference is given to areas close to Ragnar Holm’s scientific activities or the history thereof, such as the theory of electric contacts, novel applications of electric phenomena in current constrictions as well as friction, wear, fritting, corrosion and tarnish phenomena on electric contacts and related devices, such electromechanical components including MEMS and NEMS, switching contacts, and micro- or nanoelectronic components. Preference is also given to tunneling effects including the more recent physics of single electronics, and carbon contacts including developments on fullerenes and graphene. Finally, preference is given to historical perspectives on relations between industrial and public research as well as engineering and scientific practices.

The duration of the stay is a minimum of one year and a maximum of two years, starting as soon as possible. Postdoctoral studies must be commenced within six months of the date of the decision. The fellowship amounts to 27 500 SEK per month (travel grants included). The scholarship is tax-free. The recipient will also receive the Ragnar Holm plaque in silver. The candidate must obtain an agreement with a senior contact person at KTH expressing that he/she is welcome as postdoc in the research group.

Candidates must have their PhD degree from outside KTH. The period of post-doctoral fellowship at KTH must be started within five years of graduation.

Application

You are the main responsible to ensure that your application is complete according to the ad. Your complete application must be received at KTH no later than 2020-03-13.

Application form https://live.barium.se/Link/ExternalForm/12daa7dc-1711-47b1-b468-7533b65535c3

The application must include the following documents:

  • Curriculum vitae (max 2 pages)
  • A list of the ten most relevant publications
  • A description of the research the candidate will take part in at KTH (max 2 pages)
  • Three letters of recommendations, including one from the contact person at KTH
  • The candidate should also give the full address, including telephone and e-mail, at which he/she can be reached.About the position

    Period: minimum of one year and a maximum of two years
    Extent: Full-time
    Amount of scholarship: 27 500 SEK per month (travel expenses included)
    Location: Stockholm
    Start date: According to the agreement

    Contact

    Professor Mats Göthelid (Applicants within Engineering Physics)
    Telefon: +46 8 790 41 54
    gothelid[at]kth.se

    Professor Nina Wormbs (Applicants within History of Science and Technology)
    Telefon: +46 8 790 85 83
    nina[at]kth.se

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Toxic/Trans/Bodies”, POSTPONED

Welcome to The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Toxic/Trans/Bodies” with speakers Andria Nyberg Forshage (writer, poet and theorist based in Stockholm, SE) and dr Wibke Straube (Karlstad University, SE)!

When: 18th March, 10:15-12:00

Where: the seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm (Teknikringen 74 D, Stockholm).

Facebook event.

More info:

t4t4t4t4t: Fourfold Sex and Trans-Individuation at the End of the World

by Andria Nyberg Forshage

Abstract

At present, 20th-century notions of bodily immune systems modelled as repressive-productive sovereign border controls — and vice versa — are at once being superseded, obsolesced, reinforced and reinvigorated as perhaps never before. At the same time, 21st-century notions of desiring-productive, flexible, molecular immuno-security, already dated as hyper-modern, are being folded into and onto any imaginable kind of body, society, or network. In terms of data, flesh, sex, nation, sense-making, resource extraction, ecological disaster, and ongoing resistance, it is at once a situation of planetary global or civil war, armed peace, state of emergency, and stasis.  

Departing from a scenario of societal collapse following transgender bioterrorism on a hormonal and molecular scale as imagined in Torrey Peters’ sci-fi novella Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones (2016), this talk explores the drift of t4t desiring-machines in and through the bodies, farms, fields and factories of contemporary and imagined pharmacopornographic capitalism. Where t4t designates trans for trans desire, in the trans woman commune the logograph becomes self-replicating as desire and senseless noise, burnt and embedded through fleshy, tranimal metabolism. 

Connecting the fourfold of subjectivation as theorised by Gilles Deleuze in Foucault (1988) with the t4t fourfold complexes of infectious human-animal-societal undoings, as developed through a reading of Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones, how might t4t4t4t4t be understood as an operation-operator of what Gilbert Simondon has termed the transindividual?

Bio

Andria Nyberg Forshage is a writer, theorist and poet, part of the editorial team for the Paletten Art Journal and currently working with the Knowledge Hub at Public Art Agency Sweden. She has previously presented research at conferences including the First International Trans*Studies Conference at the University of Arizona and The First International Queer Death Studies Conference at Karlstad University. They have a room of their own in Stockholm and a Scorpio rising.

 

Chemicals, endocrine disruptors and unruly bodies in trans and queer art

by Wibke Straube

Abstract:

In 2018, the post of a vegan group on facebook went viral which argued, that trans and queer bodies are the “damaged” outcome of environmental pollution and endocrine disruption by POP. The post argued further that to lobby for trans and gay rights would mean to support a capitalist, exploitative system of ecological destruction. In response other vegans and this group in particular, dismissed this (cishetero)econormative position and argued this is merely one individual’s opinion. In my talk, I would like to firstly address this “singular” opinion and unpack the idea of the trans and intersex bodies as a result of endocrine disrupting chemical. I will to do this by considering the trans and intersex body as bodily entangled with environmental pollution and toxic contamination (Ah-King/Hayward 2014; DiChiro 2010; Pollock 2016). Secondly, and most centrally, I explore how endocrine disrupting toxins emerge in trans and queer art, intoxicate art practices and artistic bodies, and foster creative pollution that subverts the gender binary norms of EDC discourses and reclaims the toxic body as a monstrous, alien becoming through and within Otherness.

Bio:

Wibke Straube, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Gender Studies, Karlstad University, SE. Their work focuses on intersectional analysis of trans, non-binary and queer embodiment, affective methodologies and the affinities of different socially marginalised bodies, their forms of survival and possibilities to create zones of liveability. They have published in Environmental Humanities and NORMA International Journal for Masculinity Studies, among others. E-mail: wibke.straube[at]kau.se

CLIMAVORE – How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

Cooking Sections: CLIMAVORE On Tidal Zones, 2018.
Performance part of Meetings on Art, La Biennale di Venezia – Biennale Arte 2019, November 2019. Credit Marco Franceschin. Courtesy Delfina Foundation and Arts Council England.

As part of The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series, we are exited to present Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe), a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London exploring how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Don’t miss this opportunity to cross the boundaries between visual arts, science, architecture, ecology and geopolitics with us!
Curator Caroline Elgh Klingborg from Bonniers konsthall will also join the discussion.

When: 4th March, 13:15-15
Where: in the big seminar room at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, KTH (Teknikringen 74 D, Level 5, Stockholm).
Facebook

Also, another event 4th March, 18:00 at Bonniers konsthall: Cooking Sections in conversation with Daniel Lindvall and Caroline Elgh Klingborg.
Read more the talk at Bonniers konsthall


ABOUT THE SEMINAR:
How We Eat as Humans Change Climate 

CLIMAVORE is a long-term project initiated by Cooking Sections in 2015. It sets out to envision seasons of food production and consumption that react to human-induced climatic events and landscape alterations. Different from the now obsolete cycle of spring, summer, autumn and winter, CLIMAVORE rethinks the construction of space and infrastructure by focusing on how climate alterations offer a new set of clues to adapt our diet to them. Unexpected climatic phenomena, like subsidence, flash floods or drought, may span minutes, days, months, years or centuries. CLIMAVORE is then proposed as a form of devouring following their effects on anthropogenic landscapes. Unlike carnivore, omnivore, locavore, vegetarian or vegan, CLIMAVORE is not only about the origin of ingredients, but also about the agency that those ingredients have in providing spatial and infrastructural responses to human-induced climatic events for a certain period of time. At the core is to embrace a flexible form of eating, shifting, for instance, to drought resistant crops in a period of water scarcity or filter feeders during times of polluted or acidified waters.

For the upcoming exhibition at Bonniers Konsthall, Cooking Sections will continue to explore how forms of extraction and intensive agriculture and aquaculture can be approached through other forms of eating. Building on the work developed on the Isle of Skye in the past years CLIMAVORE is seeking to divest away from intensive salmon farming and develop regenerative aquacultures. The exhibition will be an opportunity to explore the role of salmon in the Scandinavian context, the construction of salmon as an invented synthetic colour and artificial species, and the toll its farming and production of feed pellets takes on communities in countries such as Peru, Chile and Senegal. Furthermore a new project will look into histories of runoff and expand the understanding of eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, as a way to address the changing relations between the human and the non-human, the natural and the cultural.

To learn more about CLIMAVORE click here or watch a short film.


About Cooking Sections Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe) is a duo of spatial practitioners based out of London. It was born to explore the systems that organise the WORLD through FOOD. Using installation, performance, mapping and video, their research-based practice explores the overlapping boundaries between visual arts, architecture, ecology and geopolitics. In 2016 they opened The Empire Remains Shop, a platform to critically speculate on implications of selling the remains of Empire today. Their first book about the project was published by Columbia Books on Architecture and the City.

Cooking Sections was part of the exhibition at the U.S. Pavilion, 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. Their work has also been exhibited at the 13th Sharjah Biennial; Manifesta12, Palermo; Lafayette Anticipations, Paris; Serpentine Galleries, London; Atlas Arts, Skye; Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Storefront for Art & Architecture, New York; Peggy Guggenheim Collection; HKW Berlin; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; and have been residents in The Politics of Food at Delfina Foundation, London. Their work has been featured in a number of international publications (Lars Müller, Sternberg Press, Volume, Frieze Magazine amongst others). They currently lead a studio unit at the Royal College of Art, London. They have recently been awarded the Special Prize at the 2019 Future Generation Art Prize and are nominated for the Visible Award.