The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Re:Sound – Sound as Evidential Medium in an Age of Crisis”, ONLINE 28th January at 13:15 (CET)

The Stars Beneath Our Feet (2015), video still. (© Louise Mackenzie)

Welcome to the first session in The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series 2021!

When: 28 Jan 2021, 13:15-15:00 (CET)
Where: Zoom (link will be sent out after registration). Please, have your name visible upon entering.
Registration: In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub[at]gmail.com by 26th January 2021 at noon (CET) the latest.
Recording: The session will be recorded, and possibly also made available online at a later stage. By attending the seminar, you accept these conditions (and can of course choose to keep your camera switched off).

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ABSTRACT
This session, moderated by Morten Søndergaard and Janna Holmstedt, will focus on sound as evidence and sonic explorations in the hybrid field between scientific and artistic practices. It seeks to look beyond the visual, attend to sonically mediated phenomena, and explore how sound and listening might offer ways to navigate fields and areas on the borders of uncertainty and imagination in an age of crisis.

The seminar gathers the contributors to the recently released Special Section (ed. Morten Søndergaard) of Leonardo Music Journal (LMJ) Vol. 30, December 2020 (all the articles are available online). The artist-researchers who have contributed to this Special Section, follow a line of inquiry into the construction of evidence and its ethical implications. Søndergaard suggests that geopolitical situations of crisis force us to look at the politics of evidence – and how it is being practiced. In doing so, it operates between scientific and aesthetic modes of approximation. It is this intricate relation between world, data, sound, representation and causality the Special Section is investigating. The main claim running through all the articles is that this relation is as intricate as it is challenging, and that we need to reimagine what evidence is, reclaim its politics, through sound.

Here, listening emerges as a shared orientation and critical mode of inquiry in technological layered and mediated environs, a strategy even, for moving the taken for granted – the unnoticed or oppressed background – to the affective foreground, as well as a form of activism and resistance. In different ways, the artist-researchers explore the potential of a sonic sensibility that can reorient the politics of visibility.

In the LMJ Special Section, Tullis Rennie investigates sociosonic interventions in the context of social engaged art, and the role of disruption and distributed authorship. Laura Beloff, in her contribution on human-plant relations, asks: What does it mean to hear through technological mediation? Louise Mackenzie further investigates technologically embodied and layered forms of looking and listening to nonhuman entities such as microorganisms, while Marie Højlund and Morten Riis invite us to consider processes of transduction and atmospheres as relational attunements in their sonic interventions with wind mills. Janna Holmstedt suggests that “the transformative role of sound and listening troubles Western knowledge systems in fruitful ways”, and Stephanie Loveless proposes the flaneuserie sonore, feminist soundwalking, as a way to recontextualize the practice of walking in literature and art, arguing for listening as a feminist and ecologically oriented mode of engaging with the world. Freya Zinovieff and Gabriela Aceves Sepúlveda further demonstrate that “to listen attentively to the sonic is to situate oneself at the intersection of geopolitics and sensory perception” in what they, with Pratt and Haraway, term Anthropocene Contact Zones.

BIOGRAPHIES
Laura Beloff is an active artist and accidental academic working in the intersection of art, science and technology. She currently works at Aalto University, Finland.
Marie Højlund is a sound artist, composer and assistant professor in sound studies at Aarhus University, Denmark. She received her PhD in 2017 with her thesis on sound, noise and atmospheres in Danish hospitals: “Overhearing—An Attuning Approach to Noise in Danish Hospitals.”
Morten Riis is a sound artist and composer and holds a PhD degree in electronic music from Aarhus University. He has written articles and books on artistic research and music technology, conducted workshops over most of Europe and has received commissions from leading festivals and ensembles in Denmark, Germany and Poland.
Janna Holmstedt is an artist and researcher investigating listening as a situated practice, composition in the expanded field and the cultivation of care and environmental attention. She is part of the research group The Posthumanities Hub, and received her PhD in 2017 with her thesis “Are You Ready for a Wet Live-In? Explorations into Listening”. She currently works at KTH Royal Institute of Technology and National Historical Museums, Sweden.
Stephanie Loveless is a sound artist and a lecturer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where she directs and the Center for Deep Listening at Rensselaer. She holds MFAs from Bard College and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Louise Mackenzie is an artist and researcher based in the U.K., affiliated with the Cultural Negotiation of Science research group, Northumbria University.
Tullis Rennie is a composer, improvising trombonist, electronic musician and field recordist. He is cofounder of Walls on Walls and senior lecturer in music at City, University of London.
Freya Zinovieff is a sound artist and theorist who uses emerging technologies to research the geopolitics of sound in borderlands. 
Gabriela Aceves Sepúlveda researches the histories of media arts from a feminist perspective and produces interactive installations. She has degrees in graphic design, visual arts and cultural history.
Morten Søndergaard is an active curator, exhibition designer and academic working in the intersection of art, science and technology. He is currently working at Aalborg University, Denmark.

Water@theCentre, 3d December – Speed Talks on Water Relations and Sustainable Water Futures

Welcome to this open digital conference at KTH where water is at the centre.

If you are hungry for oceanic humanities tune in to Cecilia Åsberg’s speed talk in session C, where new and unconventional approaches to how to think, work with, make use of, and take care of our most precious resource are explored.

The conference will look at advances in science and technology that helps us manage water – our most precious resource – sustainably now and in the future. We also discuss the role of universities for collaborative knowledge production, in water as well as in other areas. What is needed of us to make collaboration meaningful? In three parallel speed talk sessions, we learn about new discoveries and research across all disciplines.

Program
09.00-09.20    Welcome and Introduction
09.20-10.00     Keynote lecture: Prof. Dr. Janet Hering, Director of Eawag
10.00-10.15     Break
10.15-11.00     Parallel speed talk sessions:
Session A: Transforming water infrastructure
Session B: Healthy, safe and inclusive
Session C: New horizons for water

11.00-11.15     Break
11.15-12.00     Panel discussion on the role of universities

More info and registration
Detailed program can be found here

Gender Studies Conference 12-13 Nov 2020 (online), keynotes and programme is out!

Keynote speakers:

Cecilia Åsberg – More-than-human feminisms, and sea changes
KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Linköping University, Sweden

Roman Kuhar – Anti-gender movements across Europe and beyond
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Kyla Schuller – The Future of Gender: Rethinking the Sex/Gender Distinction
Rutgers University, USA

The 2020 Gender Studies conference explores futures as matters of intense politics, imaginings and debates from feminist and intersectional perspectives. The conference theme, “reclaiming futures”, suggests that how futures are envisioned, enacted and contested, in the present and in the past, has significant implications for equality and social justice and the very possibilities of a livable and just world. The conference asks what kinds of feminist and intersectional engagements with possible futures have emerged, are emerging, or may be imagined. We hope to investigate collectively the implications of the ongoing social, political and environmental changes for the future of gender studies and feminist politics.

Read more here: https://events.tuni.fi/genderstudiesconference2020/speakers/

Environmental Racism is Garbage! Symposium – Call for Submissions, deadline 30 Nov, 2020

Submission Deadline:  30 November 2020  
Symposium: 27-29 May 2021  

The aim of this interactive virtual research-creation and art symposium is to bear modest witness to waste as a symptom of environmental racism. At least one billion people live in over a quarter of a million slums worldwide, often with no formal waste or sanitation infrastructure or services (Davis 2007). And in economically affluent countries, landfills and other waste management systems are most often sited in or close to poor and racialized communities (for example, Amegah and Jaakkola 2016; Furedy 1993; Mothiba, Moja, and Loans 2017; Parizeau 2006) who bear a disproportionate burden of persistent exposure to the risks, hazards and contamination of pollution (Hird in press; Hird and Zahara 2016). 

Environmental Racism is Garbage seeks knowledge production and acts of resistance at the intersection of art, politics, and the relationship between racialized injustice and ecological crisis. We invite contributions and collaborations from visual and performance-based artists, curators, theorists and activists, to create submissions that engage with the interconnections between environmental health, socio-economic conditions, racialized discrimination, social justice. We are interested in new or recent work in any medium that could be displayed in a browser. Transdisciplinary work driven by creative inquiry and lived experience will be forefronted.

This virtual (web-based) symposium will be synchronous and asynchronous and feature artwork displayed in the browser as well as keynote speakers, discussion panels and other additions. The symposium will be archived on a dedicated website.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Project description and [technical] requirements for displaying (online), including artist/author statement (2 pages maximum).
  2. Supporting documentation: i.e. maximum 5 images, 1 (3 min or under) video clip or sound recording sample.
  3. Current CV (3 pages maximum) for all team members
  4. Artist/author/activist/curator/theorist biography for all team members (maximum 100 words each)

Please submit your work through this form by November 30, 2020. Submissions will be reviewed by a transdisciplinary panel including members of The Seedbox Consortium, Canada’s Waste Flow, and Queen’s University. 

Priority will be given to applicants who are Indigenous, Black, people of colour, women, LGBTQ2+, people with disabilities, and/or are members of other equity-seeking groups.

Each project selected will receive a payment of $1000 CAD and another $500 CAD per additional artist, for a total of up to $2000 CAD per submission. Project Fees will be paid after completion of the symposium. Details of the post-symposium publication to follow.
The full call for submission can be found here
Please submit projects here by November 30th, 2020  

We invite you to share this call with colleagues who might be interested, and direct any questions to: help@environmentalracismisgarbage.art

Apply NOW for the PhD course Gender and Sustainability: Introducing Feminist Environmental Humanities, deadline 2nd November 2020.

Please circulate in your networks!
How to apply? Please scroll down.

About the course Gender and Sustainability: Introducing Feminist Environmental Humanities

This online PhD course combines critical and creative perspectives on gender and sustainability from the emerging field of environmental humanities as it overlaps with science, technology, humanities, art and feminist theory-practices. It explores postdisciplinary directions in sustainability from a set of positions in environmental humanities and feminist posthumanities.

The course provides an introduction into the conceptual landscape of feminist environmental humanities, and an orientation into its methodological trajectories across the fields of science, technology, art and design. Notions of different scientific traditions in the past and present, and of inter- and transdisciplinary research are presented and framed in ways that are particularly useful for PhD researchers pursuing environmental humanities/postdisciplinary studies and practice-oriented research in art, technology and design. PhD researchers are provided with an understanding of key concepts – and the relationship between research questions, methods, objectives and outcomes – through lectures, literature seminars, workshops and collaborative project work. The course introduces participants to thinking on situated knowledge practices and ethics amidst a plethora of critical methodologies, qualitative and innovative methods, and performative research practices. On completion of the course, PhD researchers will be provided with tools to critically reflect over the epistemological and ethical challenges inherent to their own research practices and doctoral work, but also in relationship to other actors involved in the very social business of scholarship.

This new electable course (FAD3115) at KTH Royal Institute of Tecnology, in the doctoral program, Art, Technology and Design (7,5 credits), is an educational effort, supported by the KTH Equality Office for the integration of knowledge on gender equity in sustainable development research, provided by the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment.

Participants

To be eligible for the course, PhD researchers must have completed a masters’ degree or have an equivalent level of education in STS, history of science, technology and environment studies, gender studies, technology, art or design (such as architecture, planning, civil engineering, arts, crafts, and design) or affiliated subjects within the humanities and social sciences.

Preliminary dates (online)

Module 1 – Re-inventing nature, re-inventing methodology, November 30 + December 1
Module 2 – Doing gender and sustainability: Practice-oriented research, December 14-15
Module 3 – Speculative ethics, 4-5 February
Module 4 – Gender and sustainability in new registers: Knowledge communication, Suggested for March 2021

Coordinators

The course will be coordinated and taught by prof. Cecilia Åsberg, dr Janna Holmstedt, Dept. of History of Science, Technology and Environment, associate prof. Meike Schalk, School of Architecture, at KTH, and dr Marietta Radomska, Gender Studies, Linköping University.

Guest teachers are associate prof. Charlotte Holgersson, Organisation and Management at the Department of Industrial Economics and Management, associate prof. Jennifer Mack and dr Tijana Stevanovic, School of Architecture, at KTH, associate prof. Christina Fredengren, Stockholm University, prof. Isabelle Doucet, Chalmers Technical University, Dr Heidi Kajita Svenningsen, Copenhagen University and prof. Elke Krasny, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna.

The course is an open collaboration with the InterGender University Consortium and Research School in Interdisciplinary Gender Studies www.intergender.net and The Posthumanities Hub, a nonconventional research group and platform for feminist posthumanities www.posthumanities.net

Application for this Doctoral Course

Deadline for application is 2nd November 2020.

We are grateful to have received a lot of interest for this course, so we ask PhD students to formally register for this course to be accepted in the following manner:

Please apply FORMALLY to the PhD course Gender & Sustainability by submitting an APPLICATION to dr Janna Holmstedt, jannaho[at]kth.se.

Include this application in your email:

  • CV (short bio), one page
  • Letter of motivation, half a page (why you would benefit from this course in your PhD-work)
  • Description of PhD project, one page, with aim and research question, material and practice-oriented/methodological approaches and challenges


We look forward to your application!

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “Ingesting the Hydrocene” with Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris

When: 9 December, 13:15-15:00 (Swedish time)

Where: Online. In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub@gmail.com by 7th Dec 2020 at the latest.

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris, Penelope and Lucinda, film still, 2016

Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris. Photo: Emmeli Person

Meet Australian/Swedish curator, writer and lecturer Bronwyn Bailey-Charteris! Bronwyn is based in Stockholm, a current PhD student at UNSW Art & Design researching water and art in her thesis entitled ‘Ingesting the Hydrocene: Watery thinking for artistic response-ability in the climate crisis’. She is employed at Stockholm University, based at Accelerator and leading the Art+Research program, as well as a Lecturer in Department of Culture and Aesthetics for the Masters of Art Curating. Bronwyn was previously Curator at Index – The Swedish Contemporary Arts Foundation. Research interests are focused upon processes of ecology in contemporary art, water as social metaphor and feminist methodologies. Working with practical learning platforms, artistic research, publications, and exhibitions, she works internationally as a curator and lecturer.
https://bronwynbc.com/
https://su-se.academia.edu/BronwynBaileyCharteris

Ingesting the Hydrocene

The Hydrocene is a curatorial theory and practice Bronwyn has created to amplify the pioneering ways some artists and curators are collaborating with water. The Hydrocene argues for artistic methods of thinking with water in the age of accelerating climate crises. The Hydrocene is embodied and relational. It amplifies unexamined perspectives on the interrelation of art, climate, water and intersectional feminisms. By arguing for water-centered artistic practices, the Hydrocene offers up a model for engaging with embodiment, hydrofeminism, transcorporeality and response-ability in the interconnected zone of natureculture. The presentation will offer a short introduction to the Hydrocene and then expand upon artist Latai Taumoepeau – specifically her work with ice, water torture and the climate crisis.

The Posthumanities Hub Seminar “A Critical Cartography of New Materialist Constellations & Interventions in Times of Terror(ism)” with Dr. Evelien Geerts

When: 5 November, 13:15-15:00 (Swedish time)

Where: Online. In order to take part in the seminar, please register by sending an email to the.posthumanities.hub@gmail.com by 3rd November 2020 at the latest.

As part of The Posthumanities Hub Seminar Series, we are exited to present Dr. Evelien Geerts (PhD UC Santa Cruz), a multidisciplinary philosopher and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Birmingham (UK), working on the ERC-funded ‘Urban Terrorism in Europe (2004-19): Remembering, Imagining, and Anticipating Violence’ project. Her research interests include new materialisms, critical epistemologies, political philosophical questions of identity, difference, and violence, and critical & diffractive pedagogies. She has published in Philosophy Today, Women’s Studies International Forum and Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge, is furthermore an avid philosophy meme-creator, and part of the Dutch Journal of Gender Studies’ editorial board.

Dr. Evelien Geerts

A Critical Cartography of New Materialist Constellations & Interventions in Times of Terror(ism)

Abstract:
This paper anticipates on my monograph project on critical new materialist theories and the idea of “theorizing from the ground up” during times of global crisis (such as the COVID-19 crisis we are currently experiencing; see Geerts 2020) and terror(ism) in particular.

Using (and commenting on) the new materialist methodologies of critical cartography and diffraction, this paper first of all wishes to reflect upon what it means to “theorize from the ground up” in a feminist philosophical manner by offering a situated critical cartography of contemporary new materialist thought. It is then argued that such a critical cartography is not only a novel but also much needed undertaking, as we, more than almost two decades after the Habermas-Derrida dialogues on terror(ism) (Borradori 2003), are in need of a Zeitgeist-adjusted conceptual framework that takes the more-than-human seriously. Such a “grounded”, critical new materialist framework could assist us with painting a more holistic picture of the complex ontological, epistemological, and eco-ethico-political entangled aspects of global crises, and, specifically, terrorist events, such as the Paris 2015 and Brussels 2016 attacks; the actual terror they produce; and the bio-/necropolitical repercussions they often engender.

STREAMS online 5-7 August! The Posthumanities Hub will host a live session 6 August

Photo: Signe Johannessen

STREAMS, an international conference for the Environmental Humanities (EH), seeks to offer a space in which the experimental and dynamic field of EH can meet, discuss and set out future directions for thinking and acting amidst the ongoing ecological disaster.

The next upcoming event is Streaming STREAMS, 5–7 August 2020, where several presentations are streamed live.

Welcome to join the entire Streaming Streams, with conversations and trailers, and The Posthumanities Hub, submerged at ART LAB GNESTA, 6 August 14:00-15:00

The conference STREAMS will be held in Stockholm, 3–7 August 2021.